Thoughts from my first Church Admin class

Some of us are pretty bitter and cynical about clergy. I know that I am. I mean, honestly, for any extended period of time of fellowship, I’ve known only one really good pastor. The others? Of course, it could have been the structure of the denomination which allowed certain things to go on. Anyway, I could go on, but you should know that I’m pretty cynical about clergy.

But this weekend, surrounded by seven or so pastors (I was the only not currently nor ever will be crowd) I got a sneak peek where many congregants don’t. These people shared their disasters and successes, hopes and fears, weaknesses and a search for strengths. They love their jobs, their congregations, and their calling. They are just like everyone else, I reckon. It was interesting to see how a solid structure worked, and sometimes didn’t work. But, through those structural failures, these pastors kept fighting.

What was of interest to me was that they took the failures of their congregations personally. They want to share the message of Christ and strengthen their own congregations from within. They really have a love for their calling and a desire for transformation.

And, as I stated earlier, listening to them made me depressed that much more to know what damage has been done and is being done by bad pastors. And, it made me admire that much more those who are good pastors. Those who are  imperfect, weak…. focused on Christ, ever seeking and searching for what they can do to make the community of Christ stronger. These were some awesome testimonies that I heard this weekend, although surely none were offered.

So, for those who regularly abuse the good pastors because of the bad pastors… stop it.

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7 Replies to “Thoughts from my first Church Admin class”

  1. Thanks for those words. Often the sincere man of God has no one to take his part. There are times that he is maligned, mistreated, and abused by those he loves and want to help. His motives are sometimes questioned, his wisdom and decisions as well. If he is truly God’s man, he learns that it seldom accomplishes anything to defend himself. It only makes things worse. He must silently suffer on.
    It helps to know that some actually see behind things and recognize them as they truly are.

  2. I’ll stop abusing my pastor right now. lol. Actually, you are right. Most pastors work hard and to much on themselves because they feel the need to do so. It’s usually the fault of the congregation and the leadership of the elders for not standing side by side with the pastor to help him out and shoulder some of the burden. I am sadden about your experience in your last church, but I am pleased that you just did not give up and were able to distinguish God from the imperfect church. I will pray for you, Joel.

    1. Thanks, Doug. I need it. I find that far too often, people cannot distinguish God from the imperfect Church, bible interpretation, religious experience. I ain’t going to lie and tell you it was easy or that I never had a problem with it. I mean, even now, it isn’t that easy.

    2. Thanks, Doug. I need it. I find that far too often, people cannot distinguish God from the imperfect Church, bible interpretation, religious experience. I ain’t going to lie and tell you it was easy or that I never had a problem with it. I mean, even now, it isn’t that easy.

  3. The bad pastor does not learn from his mistakes. He keeps on going down and down because he believes he’s doing the right thing.

    How dare Paul criticize Peter! I mean, didn’t Peter and the other 11, yes Judas too, actually walk and talk with Jesus. How dare this “new guy” criticize Peter! (ok, enough facetiousness).

    The good pastor listens and learns as he goes.From other pastors, from his congregation, even listens to people from without the congregation, God forbid.

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