Illustration aus: Das hohe Lied, farbige Orig....
Illustration aus: Das hohe Lied, farbige Orig.-Lithographien von Lovis Corinth, Berlin, Cassirer, 1911 (Pan-Presse) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Keel sees Song 1.2–3 pulling from a Ugaritic myth, one of Shachar and Shalim, where the god El bends over two women:

He stooped (and) kissed their lips;
behold! their lips were sweet,
sweet as pomegranate.
In the kissing (there was) conception,
in the embracing (there was) pregnancy.

Bede: But if the breasts of Christ, that is, the source of the Lord’s revelation, are better than the wine of the law, how much more will the wine of Christ, that is, the perfection of evangelical doctrine, surpass all the ceremonies of the law? If the sacraments of his incarnation vivify, how much more will the knowledge and vision of his divinity glorify? COMMENTARY ON THE SONG OF SONGS 1.1.1.

Isn’t it odd that it was easier for them to see this as an allegory that led to further allegorizing a God or Jesus with breasts (El Shaddai, anyone?) than it is to acknowledge the plain sense meaning that the woman in question was doing wild and crazy things to the man’s thoughts?