Safe and Sound, Appoggiatura, Semiotics, and the Gospel

This is the theme song for the new movie, The Hunger Games… involving an Appalachia of the Future:

I remember tears streaming down your face
When I said, I’ll never let you go
When all those shadows almost killed your light
I remember you said, Don’t leave me here alone
But all that’s dead and gone and passed tonight

Just close your eyes
The sun is going down
You’ll be alright
No one can hurt you now
Come morning light
You and I’ll be safe and sound

Don’t you dare look out your window

Darling, everything’s on fire
The war outside our door keeps raging on
Hold onto this lullaby
Even when the music’s gone
Gone

Just close your eyes
The sun is going down
You’ll be alright
No one can hurt you now
Come morning light
You and I’ll be safe and sound

Just close your eyes
You’ll be alright
Come morning light,
You and I’ll be safe and sound…

Anyway, it got me to thinking, especially when I read this story which relates to the singer Adele:

You know the feeling. It’s one like this: “Your hair’s standing up on end, shivers going down your spine, a lump coming into your throat, even tears running down your eyes,” says John Sloboda, a professor of music psychology at London’s Guildhall School of Music and Drama. Sloboda has studied physical reactions to music and found that one musical ornament in particular triggers a strong emotional reaction.

It’s called an appoggiatura, from the Italian word “to lean.” And while it’s tough to define, it’s not unlike a grace note. It’s sometimes dissonant and resolves into a main note. (here)

Call me whistful, but I think that all of this plays together, in my opinion, with performance, semiotics, Liturgy, and why we must take the Gospel verbally before we read it.

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