Question of the Day: How do you worship God?

Ecstatic worship services are the rage now, often times seen in more charismatic and pentecostal circles. I do not disparage them whatsoever, as I have been known to enjoy such a service – although not in a charismatic or pentecostal fellowship – a time or two.The songs are lively, loud, and repetitive. They generally focus on the power of God, don’t they?

Others worship rather, well, dryly, singing the old hymns. Generally organized around a choir, focused more theologically.

So, I’ve sung both songs, although not very well. I’ve okay in both types of services – the loud, not the stupid, and the quite, not the boring. But, my favorite type of worship is, as Dr. Cargill wrote, reason. I love to Reason with the Word. For me, I believe that there is still a presence to be felt in the worship of God, and I can feel that presence without a song. Sometimes, there is a presence in a book that I’ve read, or a blog post, or just picking up the bible and reading a passage. The other day, I read 1st Peter 1 in the New Living Translation which I keep on my desk, and there it was, a presence of God.

He goes on to write,

a life of faith is not about a set of orthodox beliefs, but a set of adopted behaviors that rejects complacency and instead embraces a life dedicated to solving problems, be they intellectual or practical, individual or social.

And let the congregation say amen!

I do not believe that the outlandish things you see people do in the name of ‘praise and worship’ is glorifying God at all. Nor do I believe that it is limited to dry, boring recitation of doctrinal beliefs.

As one who believes in the Communication of Grace* through the two sacraments, baptism and the Eucharist, I find mediating upon them, and what they meant to the earliest followers of Jesus Christ and what they will mean to my children as something that gives me great joy. Listening to lectures – not sermons – builds up my faith because it is not in what I know that I trust, but in what I do not know.

Some see worship as a vocal means, often loud and unruly, but there must be room for worship in the quite, the still small place where the still small voice can speak. Worship is not always about speaking to God, but God speaking to you, you hearing Him, and being in His will.

Personally, in a congregational setting, I want liberty and liturgy, but we’ll see.

So, who do you worship?

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9 Replies to “Question of the Day: How do you worship God?”

  1. When I hear the term “estatic” worship I think of John Crowder / Ben Dunn or Parry King. That is nothing like what you showed here. Let's call the Crabb Family “exuberant” because they sure are. In the category of Hymns and Spiritual Songs their music would fall under the latter.

    Can't nobody do me like jesus is clearly out of the black gospel music culture of the 70s. I have trouble with the song today becasev in the current vernacular “do m e” has sexual overtones. But as a historical piece, its good.

    Nobody today knows what “rasining my Ebenezer” means either!!

  2. Bill, you are correct, and I didn't mean to imply that the Crabb family – whom I love to listen to – was the Crowder type. My point there was that many use loud music, etc…. to put themselves into a 'mood'.

    And you are correct on your other points as well!

  3. Bill, you are correct, and I didn't mean to imply that the Crabb family – whom I love to listen to – was the Crowder type. My point there was that many use loud music, etc…. to put themselves into a 'mood'.

    And you are correct on your other points as well!

  4. well, that wasn't the point of your post anyhow. Still I wish I could play the piano like that…

    Where is the footnote to “communication of grace*” ?

  5. Bill, I wish I could just clap in rhythm 🙂

    I forgot to add but will do so now –

    *communication of Grace does not mean, for me, that grace is added to, but that Grace is acted out, shown through, demonstrated by these two sacraments.

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