Love’s Language – The Royal ‘We’

Micki Sievwright has a new set of wheels that her husband constantly refers to as “my truck.” The same goes for their apartment and the backyard grill.

Turns out the pronouns the Denver couple use count for more than mere semantics in the long haul. A new study suggests that “we” language used between spouses in times of conflict goes along with less negative behavior and signs of stress in lengthy marriages.

Previous studies have indicated that use of inclusive pronouns that include “we,” “our” and “us” — versus “I,” “me” and “you” — are evidence of marital satisfaction in younger couples like Sievwright and hubby Dane, both of whom are 27. The latest work, in the September issue of the journal Psychology and Aging, carries the link forward to more established pairs when conflict bubbles, and reports evidence of more relaxed heart rates and blood pressure among those with the highest “we-ness” quotients. (You can read the rest here)

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