Justin Martyr’s Absolution of Constantine’s Sunday

Justin Martyr
Justin Martyr, laying down some mad gang signs yo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This is sort of a repost, bringing back a post from 2009 to meet something we discussed this past week in Sunday School. Believe it or not, there is something of a structure to ancient worship services. This is found in Justin’s First Apology, 1.67 (I think, from memory).

On the day called Sunday there is a gathering together in the same place of all who live in a given city or rural district. The memoirs of the apostles or the writings of the prophets are read, as long as time permits. Then when the reader ceases, the president in a discourse admonishes and urges the imitation of these good things. Next we all rise together and send up prayers.

When we cease from our prayer, bread is presented and wine and water. The president in the same manner sends up prayers and thanksgivings, according to his ability, and the people sing out their assent, saying the ‘Amen.’ A distribution and participation of the elements for which thanks have been given is made to each person, and to those who are not present they are sent by the deacons.

Those who have means and are willing, each according to his own choice, gives what he wills, and what is collected is deposited with the president. He provides for the orphans and widows, those who are in need on account of sickness or some other cause, those who are in bonds, strangers who are sojourning, and in a word he becomes the protector of all who are in need.

But Sunday is the day on which we all hold our common assembly, because it is the first day on which God, having wrought a change in the darkness and matter, made the world; and Jesus Christ our Savior on the same day rose from the dead.

For He was crucified on the day before that of Saturn (Saturday); and on the day after that of Saturn, which is the day of the Sun, having appeared to His apostles and disciples, He taught them these things, which we have submitted to you also for your consideration. (First Apology, 67)

And of course, Pliny the Younger’s letter to the Emperor (10.96-97)

They asserted, however, that the sum and substance of their fault or error had been that they were accustomed to meet on a fixed day before dawn and sing responsively a hymn to Christ as to a god, and to bind themselves by oath, not to some crime, but not to commit fraud, theft, or adultery, not falsify their trust, nor to refuse to return a trust when called upon to do so. When this was over, it was their custom to depart and to assemble again to partake of food–but ordinary and innocent food. Even this, they affirmed, they had ceased to do after my edict by which, in accordance with your instructions, I had forbidden political associations. Accordingly, I judged it all the more necessary to find out what the truth was by torturing two female slaves who were called deaconesses. But I discovered nothing else but depraved, excessive superstition.

We actually have basic elements of a formalized service from very early in Christian history.

More than that, however, is Justin’s reasoning for the assembly on the First Day of the week, called Sunday. Simply put, it is for two reason.

First, because that is the day God began to create the world. Second, it is the day God began to recreate the world in the resurrection of Jesus. It is not because of Constantine and other silly notions as of late, but because of Scripture.

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