Genealogies in Genesis

First,Richard S. Hess as an interesting post up:

The genealogies of chapters 4, 5, 10, and 11 are filled with personal names. Of course, the main characters, from Adam and Eve to Abram and Sarai, are also named. The names are often overlooked by modern readers, but not by the ancient Israelites who understood Hebrew. Many of these names were important on several levels. Let us consider, for example, the name, Adam. It is not until Genesis 4:25 that it occurs for the first time as a personal name.

And then…check out Gary Simmons‘ comment here.

You Might Also Like

2 Replies to “Genealogies in Genesis”

  1. It is not until Genesis 4:25 that it occurs for the first time as a personal name.

    If the Bible had been written originally in English, and the first man had been called Man, which is a situation roughly analogous to what’s going on in the Hebrew account, would we have the confidence to say that it is only in a particular place that Man is called man as a “personal name” and not as a description. I suspect the distinction between Man as a description and Man as a name is artificial in this case.

    But now I’m quibbling. I’ve already read that post and it’s a good one. Let no one be discouraged from visiting it because of my questions about detail.

Leave a Reply, Please!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.