.@ZonderAcademic’s “Dictionary of Christianity and Science”

This is going to be huge.

The Dictionary of Christianity and Science provides, in one volume, entries on over 450 key terms, theories, individuals, movements, and debates at the intersection of Christian faith and contemporary science.

In addition, because certain topics such as the age of the Earth and the historicity of Adam and Eve provoke disagreement among Christians, the dictionary includes “Counterpoints”-like essays that advocate for the views most commonly held among evangelicals. Representatives of leading perspectives present their arguments vigorously but respectfully in these advocacy essays, allowing readers to compare options and draw their own conclusions. The dictionary is also fully cross-referenced and entries include references and recommendation for further reading.

Edited by Paul Copan, Tremper Longman III, Christopher L. Reese, and Michael G. Strauss, the Dictionary of Christianity and Science features a top-notch lineup of over 140 contributors in the fields of biblical studies, theology, philosophy, history, and various sciences. A unique reference work, it will be useful for scholars, pastors, students, and any Christian wanting to better understand the most relevant issues and ideas at the intersection of Christian faith and science.

Read more about it here.

@RickBrannan’s Lexical Commentary on 1st Timothy, now available on @Logos

GO HERE. PRE-ORDER IT ON LOGOS. This is why. Alternatively, you can order it via Amazon.

To responsibly exegete the text of First Timothy, one must become familiar with the vocabulary. But examination of word meanings involves more than simply looking up words in a lexicon and choosing a gloss that seems appropriate.

Rick Brannan evaluates the vocabulary of the First Timothy in light of the New Testament, the Septuagint (LXX), the Apostolic Fathers, the works of Philo, the works of Josephus, the Old Testament Pseudepigrapha, and other material. Many commentaries and other works of exegesis mention material from these sources to provide background information or examples of word usage, duly noting references to such works in footnotes or endnotes. Brannan’s work, however, provides full quotations (in translation) of the relevant references. Instead of relegating these citations to footnotes that are seldom if ever looked up, the cited text itself is reproduced for the reader to evaluate.

Book Announcement: “A Wesleyan Theology of the Eucharist: The Presence of God for Christian Life and Ministry”

For John and Charles Wesley, few things were more important for theology and ministry than attentiveness to the Lord’s Supper. But the commitment to the centrality of the Eucharist for Christian life and practice has waxed and waned. This book brings together Wesleyan scholars who seek to recover the importance of Holy Communion for theology and ministry.This book is in two parts. In the first, leading Wesleyan theologians reflect on the Eucharist in connection with each of the major areas of Christian theology: the doctrine of the Trinity (Geoffrey Wainwright), creation (Daniel Castelo), sin (Andrew Sung Park), Jesus Christ (John Drury), the Holy Spirit (Jason Vickers), the Church (William Abraham), salvation (Sarah Lancaster), and eschatology (Brent Peterson). In the second scholars reflect on the relationship between the Eucharist and aspects of Christian life and ministry: worship (Robin Knowles Wallace), preaching (Richard Eslinger), evangelism (Elaine Heath), formation (Paul Chilcote), ethics (Rebekah Miles), the use of money (Ed Phillips), pastoral care (Ed Wimberly), prayer (Ron Anderson), and ecumenism (Karen Westerfield Tucker).

Book reminder: “Live Like You Give a Damn!: Join the Changemaking Celebration”

Live Like You Give a Damn! declares the very good news that God is raising up a new generation, largely outside the church, to bring impressive change to the lives of our neighbors locally and globally by creating innovative forms of social enterprise and community empowerment.

The even better news is that those of us within the church can join this changemaking celebration and discover creative new ways God can use our mustard seeds to make a more remarkable difference than we ever imagined possible.

In this book Tom Sine offers practical ways you can join those who are creating their best communities, their best world, and in the process their best lives. Sine shows that in a world changing at warp speed, following Jesus is a “design opportunity.”

It is not only an opportunity to design innovative ways to make a difference but also an opportunity to create lives with a difference, in the way of Jesus, that are simpler and more sustainable–and to throw better parties along the way. Why would anyone want to settle for less and miss the best?