14 Billion. 19 Billion. 8.35. These numbers mean something, right?

The CEO of J.P. Morgan is a “free-market capitalist.” Sure….

His company received 14 BILLION DOLLARS OF TAX PAYER SUBSIDY:

JPMorgan receives a government subsidy worth about $14 billion a year, according to research published by the International Monetary Fund and our own analysis of bank balance sheets. The money helps the bank pay big salaries and bonuses. 

In a recent paper, two economists — Kenichi Ueda of the IMF and Beatrice Weder Di Mauro of the University of Mainz — estimated that as of 2009 the expectation of government support was shaving about 0.8 percentage point off large banks’ borrowing costs. That’s up from 0.6 percentage point in 2007, before the financial crisis prompted a global round of bank bailouts.

To estimate the dollar value of the subsidy in the U.S., we multiplied it by the debt and deposits of 18 of the country’s largest banks, including JPMorgan, Bank of America Corp. and Citigroup Inc. The result: about $76 billion a year. The number is roughly equivalent to the banks’ total profits over the past 12 months, or more than the federal government spends every year on education.

JPMorgan’s share of the subsidy is $14 billion a year, or about 77 percent of its net income for the past four quarters. In other words, U.S. taxpayers helped foot the bill for the multibillion-dollar trading loss that is the focus of today’s hearing.

J.P. Morgan made 19 billion in profits last year. We are giving them 14 billion in tax payer funds.

His janitor makes 8.35 an hour. He makes about 23 million a year. Anything wrong with this picture?

So, why don’t we cut the tax payer subsidies to the big companies?

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