4 Comments

  1. Gary

    Beats inerrancy. Beats inheriting it from father to son, (Oral Roberts, Jimmy Swaggert, Billy Graham, et al) which implies business and megaprofits to me.
    Keeps a power clic from forming around a personality, with inner circle people, and everyone else outsiders. Most important, each new pastor can check the previous books, to make sure no one is cooking the financial books. Not that I wouldn’t trust a pastor. But ultimate power and no visibility leads to corruption. Just check Congress.

    Reply

    1. Yup – and the megachurches you listed.

      Having the structure superimposed upon the Church does have its benefits

      Reply
  2. Know More Than I Should

    Although I have no extraordinary insights into Jack Kale’s departure, I know these transitions are not completely unheard of. One minister I knew left a denominational pastorate to minister to single mothers at a time when divorce was still frowned upon merely because no one else was filling that need at the time. Another pastor left a promising career as member in good standing in what might best be described as the “country club clergy” to invest his time on this earth in serving the homeless. Again, this was at a time when no one was filling that need.
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    Meanwhile, when it comes to Jack Kale, a couple of websites offer some hints as to Kale’s reasoning. At:
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    http://www.christianpost.com/news/former-umc-pastor-to-open-florida-church-at-beach-bar-95386/
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    Kale was quoted as saying, “They [presumably the Bishop and denominational hierarchy] told me how good this [transfer] was going to be for my career and what kind of raise I was going to get. It was very corporate and institutional.”
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    Then, from:
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    http://unitedmethodistreporter.com/2014/01/23/one-pastors-take-left-united-methodist-church/
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    three reasons emerge for Kale’s departure. Without doing any great injustice to the original, they seem to be:
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    1. Tired of “serv[ing at] the whim of a bishop [in a denomination that] has lost its ability to adapt and move with the culture.”
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    2. Found UMC to be too political, rigid, and prestige oriented.
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    3. Time to move on after almost two decades in UMC.
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    Reflecting on the above,I cannot help but wonder what a promising career Jesus might have had in Jerusalem if he hadn’t started hanging out with the wrong crowd!

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