Book Notes, @ivpacademic’s “Spirit of God: Christian Renewal in the Community of Faith “

While at times dense and jargon-laced, these essays are perhaps what the cautious rationalist needs to start toe-dipping into the fires of the Spirit. There are swatches of useful concepts – see especially Amos Young’s “pneumato-personalistic theology of creation”. Estrelda Alexanders renders a gorgeous explanation of why so many attempt to distance themselves from perceived pagan influences and Barbeau perhaps gives the most concise descriptions of the “Aldersgate” incident and the surrounding psychobiographies and clips from journals I’ve seen. If you’re currently mired in the academia and thinking of taking the Holy Spirit out for a test drive and


Book Review, @ivpacademic’s “Rediscovering Jesus: An Introduction to Biblical, Religious and Cultural Perspectives on Christ”

I am left to wonder, because of the proposed premise of this book, if we aren’t left with a more hidden Jesus than before. The second half of the book makes the book worthwhile. It examines the Jesuses of different religions, including the Gnostic, Muslim and American (yes, I did call “American” a religion). In this, the authors (while presenting an evangelical outlook) tackle what Christianity would be if, say, the Mormon Jesus of Joseph Smith, was the dominant Jesus. This “Jesus Outside the Bible” should be expanded more, giving special attention to various other Jesus projects (including the Quest


In the Mail from @IVPAcademic: Business Ethics in Biblical Perspective: A Comprehensive Introduction

t is legal for CEOs to make 300 times the amount of the average worker. But is this fair and just? Is it ethical for a customer to purchase a digital camera for the sole purpose of using it on a ski trip and then return the item to the store afterwards? Should companies who purchase advertising space on websites that offer pirated videos for download be held accountable for breaking intellectual property laws? The world of business is fraught with ethical challenges. Some of these are relatively straightforward, but others are complicated and require careful reflection. While there


Book Reminder: @ivpacademic’s “Mapping Your Academic Career: Charting the Course of a Professor’s Life”

Thanks to IVP-Academic for sending this review copy along. You’re finishing your first year of teaching. It’s been exciting and gratifying, but there’ve been some wobbly episodes too. How will you carve out a space to flourish? You’re feeling secure in mid-career, with some accomplishments to be proud of. But what should success really look like? You’re nearing the end of your career, and sometimes apprehensive about the blank slate of retirement. What might it look like to finish well? In Mapping Your Academic Career Gary Burge speaks from decades of teaching, writing and mentoring. Along the way he

Accordance Bible / Books / Creeds

In the (e)mail from @AccordanceBible, @ivpacademic’s “Ancient Christian Doctrine (5 Volumes)”

Thanks to H at Accordance for this! From the Accordance Website: This exciting five-volume series follows up on the acclaimed Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture to provide patristic commentary on the Nicene Creed. The series renders primary Greek, Latin, Coptic and Syriac source material from the church fathers in lucid English translation (some here for the first time) and gives readers unparalleled insight into the history and substance of what the early church believed. Including biographical sketches, a timeline of ancient Christian sources, indexes, bibliographies and keys to original language sources as well as the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed in Greek, Latin


Review, “A Change of Heart: A Personal and Theological Memoir” @ivpacademic

This is a guest post by Evan W. Rohrs-Dodge, a UMC pastor in New Jersey and a founding member of Via Media Methodists. I briefly read Thomas Oden’s memoir before I passed it on to Evan for review. In these pages can be found a great hope for the people called Methodists. While Oden is best known for his role in the Confessing Movement and in paleo-orthodoxy, what will be known after reading this book is his great love for the United Methodist Church, even if it disappoints him. Like so many of us who struggle with our membership,


Book Notes: The Pietist Vision of Christian Higher Education: Forming Whole and Holy Persons

Note, Book Notes is an abbreviated Book Review. Christian education, liberal arts, and the humanities are all considered, usually, a dead field. Indeed, the concept of a whole person, much less a holy person, does not fit into the spectrum of higher education any longer, finding a whole person replaced with a better cog. Yes, there are some higher education institutions practicing certain ideological viewpoints, such as the Reformed (as the editor and several contributors point out), but what about the Pietist view? Does the Pietist theological tradition, underpinning whole denominations and contributing significantly to many of the Wesleyan ones,