4 Comments


  1. Joel – this is a good review. I guess I am in a situation right now personally where the whole book really spoke to me on a number of levels so I didn’t see anything out of place – one thing I’d like to offer is with regard to this comment:

    For him, political systems, financial systems, and even identifiable sociological preconceptions are ‘powers’ in the Pauline sense, and it is these powers which Christ is waging war against through the Church

    I think for Gombis, these things are not themselves the powers but things corrupted by the powers – he is using them to show that while humanity may have good intentions (i.e., helping the poor) the powers are constantly seeking to keep human inistitutions corrupted (in frustration) in an effort to subvert God’s ultimate purposes – thus things like the welfare system starting out with good intentions then becoming a burden to the poor – thus the call to live as the Divine Warrior seeking to overcome the corrupting efforts of the powers through our own forms of subversive living or “truthing in love” – see yet how it works? :-)

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    1. Let me clarify – For me, I identified those things with the powers as one might the ancient Assyrians with their gods. I agree with you that Gombis is saying that our good intentions are often corrupted by these powers, but I was trying to not the systems which are created, which the powers inhibit.

      I loved the book – and frankly, without sounding hokey, it brings into sharp focus the situation in Korea and the Ivory Coast.

      A powerfully wonderful book!

      Reply
  2. Doug

    Joel, I added to my CBD wishlist. Its likely to be bought and read. Good review. BTW, you don’t happen to have a spare thousand around do ya? I could then order all my wislist. lol

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