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  1. Months ago, maybe even a couple of years, I remember discussing here the need to understand the figures of speech used by a culture. Most literalists don’t care to understand the language used by the Bible’s authors.

    Which is ironic … They believe emphatically that it means exactly what it says … whatever the heck that is.

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    1. Indeed. That’s what I’ve heard referred to as “literal” reading vs. normal reading.

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  2. “Ben” in Hebrew does mean necessarly means “son of” but could simply “descendant of”. So X ben Y is still true if X is the grand father of Y.

    Couting the number of generations between two biblical persons to estimate the number of years between them is a bad idea.

    Also, it was frequent for ancient people to become father at 60 (because rich and important people had more than one wife). This “way of life” can still be seen among Negev bedouins today.

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  3. The problem is, people say something like “I believe it means what it says” and what they mean by that is “I believe it means what it says TO ME!” As though the Bible was written to them within the last few years.

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