22 Comments

  1. Scott Fritzsche

    I am going to stick with my unknown people in the trenches and two little known individuals that have had a large impact, Mike Foster and Craig Gross. Those shall be my suggestions.

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  2. Know More Than I Should

    Sociologists often treat Southern Baptists as a subculture. After all, it was a breeding ground for Ku Klux Klan inculcation. As with Catholicism, it’s various prohibitions, phobias, and paranoias make this species of Christianity more reactionary than dynamic.

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    1. i wonder if we can – and with pause because I am a southerner by the grace of God (insert rebel yell) – consider reactionism as part of the southern make up?

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      1. Know More Than I Should

        My ancestors were in the South before the Lost Cause. Males fought and helped finance both the American Revolution as well as the War Between the States. Some of the latter were first generation Klan. Before some of their descents died of old age, a few still celebrated Lee’s birthday as if he were one of the family. Consequently, I am very much aware of the Southern disposition. That’s one reason I still pack!

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      2. Know More Than I Should

        Why naturally, he’s SBC’s great black hope. (If you don’t understand the humor in that one, look up the two Jacks – Johnson and London.)

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        1. Know More Than I Should

          Ooops, misplaced reply.

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  3. Milton Almeida

    Are you sure you meant Evangelical Lutheran Church and not the Missouri Synod Lutheran Church? Just checking my own understanding of both factions…

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  4. Scott Fritzsche

    To say that the Southern Baptists were a breeding ground for the KKK is a fairly drastic over simplification. Religion did not really enter into clan life at the beginning. It’s start was political, not religious. The fundamentalist interpretation of scripture came to play an important part in the clan, but the SBC does not adhere to the same literal interpretation as the clan does or did. The clan came to accept a perverted interpretation of serpent seed doctrine, itself a perverted interpretation. The SBC, the largest organization of Baptists, has denounced the KKK as a matter of record. Now, it is a fact that the KKK went out of its way to infiltrate and recruit from churches, notably the southern baptists, saying that they promoted the KKK is an over simplification.

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      1. Scott Fritzsche

        The KKK started as a social club for confederate veterans and turned into a violent and disgusting hate group as a reaction to the political decisions regarding southern reconstruction by the then Republican party. It’s beginnings were rooted in politics, so I think that we should lay the blame for them where it belongs is all. They did a masterful job of infiltrating the church and perverting the teachings, but it did not begin there. The poor whites in churches were simply easy victims for recruitment. Just to be clear, the KKK and what it did and does represent is repugnant.

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        1. Know More Than I Should

          You’ve managed to homogenize Klan history. The reaction to Reconstruction was true for the first Klan. The appeal to poor whites describes the second Klan. What the Klan did, and is doing, during its various incarnations is more complex than described in most descriptions. So has the socioeconomics of its adherents.

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          1. Scott Fritzsche

            I am sure that the nuances and complexities of the Klan are beyond me.

          2. Know More Than I Should

            We’re not talking “nuances” so much as very different organizations in term of both structure and membership over time.

      2. Know More Than I Should

        Actually, the academic research extends back to the days before the internet became popular.

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    1. Know More Than I Should

      SBC’s repudiation is a day late and a dollar short.

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      1. Scott Fritzsche

        Rev. Fred Luter would disagree I imagine.

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        1. Know More Than I Should

          Why naturally, he’s SBC’s great black hope. (If you don’t understand the humor in that one, look up the two Jacks – Johnson and London.)

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  5. Michelle

    I always think of the SBC as more evangelical than mainline. That shows my own bias, though–I think of the SBC that way mainly for its hardline stance on “gender roles”. Their interpretation of scripture also tends to be pretty literal in general, though, from my limited knowledge/exposure.

    The PCA strikes me as the SBC but with alcohol. (And with a band instead of a choir, but I digress 😉 )

    None of this takes into account governance of any denomination. Having said that, the Convention has centralized power somewhat, making the convention feel more like a denomination. Have you heard of/about the Baptist Faith and Message?

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    1. Know More Than I Should

      SBC evangelism explains how the regional denomination became a quasi-national church in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Even into the 1990s, a surprising number of movers and shakers on the national scene had Southern Baptist affiliation. If fact, that list almost constituted a who’s who of Washington politics.

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    2. Yup, I have. I guess for the new mainline, it is more about presence and power – and for now, the SBC has both. ;(

      But you are correct – the SBC is centralizing.

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  6. SamB

    If by Wright you mean Tom Wright, I don’t think anyone on this side of the Atlantic would call him a “high church Anglican”. The term “High Church” refers to the Anglo-Catholic “bells-and-smells” extreme of Anglicanism, with strong leanings towards Roman Catholicism, visual symbolism, rites and ceremonies. Not really Tom Wright’s bag. His strong emphasis on biblical matters puts him squarely in the “low church Anglican” camp, I think.

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