Unsettled Christianity

Gloria Dei homo vivens – St Irenaeus
June 29th, 2016 by Joel Watts

Jenson on (lack of) theology in a divided Church

jenson theology divide church

Joel Watts
Watts holds a MA in Theological Studies from United Theological Seminary. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians, as well as seeking an MA in Clinical Mental Health at Adams State University. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Comments

2 Responses to “Jenson on (lack of) theology in a divided Church”
  1. George Plasterer says

    I like Jensen a lot. Thank you for this reminder. Given the historical situation of the Pope accumulating power and abusing power, experienced by both the Orthodox and Protestant periods, division was inevitable. It even claimed the ability to unveil new revelations. Power corrupts, and the history of the church demonstrates this. In addition, at the beginning of the modern period, the multiplicity of churches likely helped the Church in its missionary expansion. However, and I say this cautiously, I am seeing movement in both the RC and in many denominations that recognize that the multiplicity of churches is a harm today. I guess I see a good theology today as possibly arising out of a particular tradition, but learning generously from the major traditions. In that sense, one can still appeal to the early creeds of course, but what we cannot do is resolve new theological questions together. The UMC is a good example of the other side of the story. Precisely because the global church has so much influence upon the UMC, progressive churches, pastors, bishops, and institutional leaders are breaking covenant.

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