8 Comments


  1. I think you are describing Radical Christianity but many use the designation Neo-Anabaptism. That name seems more fitting for the likes of John Howard Yoder, Stanley Hauerwas, James William McClendon Jr. and Nancey Murphy.

    You wrote: “To me, a Neo-Anabaptist is someone who holds broadly to the core fundamentals of historic Anabaptism, while rejecting many of the apparent problems with the original movement and the accretions of later centuries.”

    Many of the things you mention in the notes is of Mennonite origin not historic Anabaptism. People generally get the groups mixed up but they are not the same.

    Reply
    1. Dave Kinsella

      Hey A.O. Green. Nice to see you here too. No, I am specifically speaking in general terms of Neo-Anabaptism! as far as I am concerned Radical Christianity also encompasses many who are in what may be termed Fundamentalism. I was in that group for many years, while claiming to be a radical Christian. Many times a self-professed radical Christian can be very close minded and judgmental of those who do not fit their mold.

      I do consider myself a radical Christian, but a post-modern, post-evangelical, post-Anabaptist one. Dave Tomlinson, author of The Post Evangelical says in his book that post- does not denote a rejection of the past, but a moving beyond it. Perhaps a sort of growing up, but certainly an understanding of trying to reinterpret eternal truths while absorbgin all that is good in one’s traditions into the current climate one finds oneself in.

      Reply

      1. I was speaking in terms of a continuation of the spirit that manifested itself during the Radical Reformation. Wess Daniels touched on this matter here: http://tinyurl.com/nlzdvnv

        I can see where you are coming from and at the end of the day I agree with much of what you said, and do you have a blog that you personally write so that I can see what you produce in the future?

        Reply
        1. Dave Kinsella

          I may have missed the thrust of you comment then. Excuse me if I did.

          No, I don’t. I used to blog many moons ago when I was into evangelism in a big way. But i deleted that along with my YouTube channel which had over a million hits at the time, and over 1000 subscribers. I was very proud of it, but felt it was a snare and an idol, so I deleted it. Sometimes I regret it as I lost many personal moments I can never regain, but I did what I had to at the time. I may start blogging again.

          Reply

          1. I think you should have access to my e-mail, so let me know if you decide to do so again.

  2. w

    I would be interested in more information about connecting with Neo-Anabaptist groups.
    Is there a resource or some direction you may be able to point me to?

    Reply
    1. Dave Kinsella

      Hmmm… Neo-Anabaptist groups? My impression is it is more of an interdenominational movement. There may be a few groups out there that are actively Neo-Anabaptist, without necessarily calling themselves that. They are very similar to Neo-Orthodox or Post-Evangelical only the emphasis is on the core doctrines of Classical Anabaptism. Of course there are many out there who may hold to those ethical and/or doctrinal standards who do not see themselves as Anabaptist per se. Someone who comes to mind instantly is Shaine Claiborne. I attended an Amish-Mennonite fellowship here in Ireland for over 3 years, and there were many of the younger generation who I would definitely have called Neo-Anabaptist, even though they would not have called themselves that name. They were cultural Amish and Mennonite people, trying to interpret and live out their faith in the modern world. While they went along with some the system, they had grave concerns about some it and a lot of frustration with the old ways, and the blind dogmatism that pervaded certain sectors.

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