the best new blog/resource out there…

The goal of Biblical Studies Online is to provide both biblical scholars and the interested wider public with ease of access to quality biblical scholarship, as it comes available online.

More and more biblical scholarship is being published open-access and online – not only in traditional book form, but in a variety of media, including videos and sound recordings.

Unfortunately, it is often difficult to locate these resources on the internet, and sometimes difficult for those less experienced with biblical scholarship to distinguish worthwhile material from that which is inaccurate or even grossly misleading. And when it comes to the Bible, there is no shortage of the latter to be found. For this reason, Biblical Studies Online offers a gateway for the dissemination and publicizing of worthwhile open-access, online biblical scholarship.

To search for online Biblical Studies resources, please either click on the category in which you are interested, or use the search-box, in the column to the right.

Biblical Studies Online is maintained by:

Prof. James Crossley, University of Sheffield

Dr. Deane Galbraith, University of Otago

via About |.

a project worthy of your attention

The task which I am setting myself (if I ever master the technology) is to set up an interactive world map, which can display the stories of each of the groups I have looked at, against what was happening economically and politically in their geographical locations which may have contributed to their foundations and eventual decline. I also want to look at the common themes which run between them, problems and successes, hopefully resulting in a more complete view of disparate groups which tried to carve out a niche for themselves in a rapidly changing world in such a similar way.

I think I have my work cut out for me.  If anyone has any advice, it will be gratefully received.

via Attempting to address the digital dark age… | bshephistory’s Blog.

Jeremy Thompson on the Bible Sense Lexicon

Some nets are specialized for catching specific kinds of fish. You wouldn’t want to try to catch a guppie with a net that has large holes in it. Similarly, you wouldn’t want to try to catch salmon with the same net you use to get your pet goldfish out of its bowl.

Like a specialized net, the Bible Sense Lexicon allows you to capture only the meanings you’re searching for. Consider the problem of English homonyms: “When he said he went to lie down he told a lie.” “Tennis players love to keep their opponents at love.” “The girl in the band was wearing a band around her head.” The same word can have very different meanings. What we may fail to realize, though, is that this can wreak havoc on our Bible searches.

via Specialize Your Searches with the Bible Sense Lexicon | Logos Talk: The Logos Bible Software Blog.

Read the rest there…

A New Year, a new blog direction

With each “new year” people like to make changes. They vow this or that, to do this or that or not to do this or that; however, most fall back into their ways soon enough. The same goes with blogging. I’ve changed course once or twice on this blog, moving from fundamentalism to a better Christianity. I’ve also stopped with the heresy hunting, among other things. And, I’ve stopped with the RSS feed. I’ve turned that, the re-posting of stories that I like or catches my attention, to the blog’s Facebook page.

With all of these changes taking place naturally over the past few years, I don’t really need another change. I think such committals are usually a sign of the blogger and a lack of desire to continue blogging.

This year is going to be a busy one, I think. I have to start writing the dissertation. I have an offer to submit to two volumes in a rather popular and heavily academic Brill series (3 are out thus far). Further, I would like to submit to two SBL sections this year. Granted, one of those proposals, and if accept then one of those papers, will be the basis for one of the chapters submitted to the Brill series, but over all this will be a very busy year for me.

I am looking for dedicated contributors, of course. Still. Always. So, let me know.

And, I will try to focus on Mary a bit and try to show you why I have no issue with the adoration of Mary. Remember, adoration and worship are two different things.

Holy BookMobile, Batman: 500 Book Mega Pack from @Logos for #Christmas

500-book-mega-pack

Wow:

This is the definitive library-builder bundle. We’ve pulled together 500 classic titles into one amazing collection—and we’re offering it for over 96% off the regular price! Yeah, you read that right—over 96% off. If you were to pick these up at any other time, you’d pay over $10,000. But right now, you can round out your library with 500 new books for less than $1.00 a title!

500 Book Mega Pack – Logos Bible Software.

Almost 200,000 pages… It looks awesome and frankly, is an awesome price. For those who can’t pay the full amount just now, get the payment plan.

212 authors, including:

  • Zwingli
  • Isaac Watts
  • Adolf Van Harnack
  • Robert Murray McCheyne
  • Charles Finney
  • John Darby
  • Jacobus Arminius
  • George Whitefield
  • Myles Coverdale
  • John Newton
  • Robert S. Candlish

Other books as well:

Here’s the rub – it lasts until 31 December. Go. Get. It. Now.

Daily Readings Recommendation for #2014: Co-Workers of the Truth: Meditations for Every Day of the Year @logos

I’ve happened upon this book, quite by accident, thanks to the newly redesigned iPad app for Logos. It is included in the daily devotional section. I have made a habit of reading it, almost daily, for the past few weeks.

It is…deeply theological and not altogether different than what the current Pope is saying.

Cardinal Ratzinger offers selected passages from his profound spiritual and theological writings as meditations for each day of the year. He picked the title of this book from verse 8 in the third letter of St. John, which he also adapted for his coat of arms: “Co-Workers of the Truth.” Just as these words signify for St. John the participation of all the faithful in the service of the Gospel, which includes the faithful extending hospitality to all who come as messengers of faith, so too Ratzinger shows the importance of our uniting charity with truth to make possible the proclamation of the Gospel. Through his meditations here, he hopes to help awaken in each reader the courage and generosity to become coworkers with the Gospel, which is the truth of Jesus Christ.

via Co-Workers of the Truth: Meditations for Every Day of the Year – Logos Bible Software.

Ways for Institutions to Embrace Student Blogging

While we are finishing redrafting the SBL paper, I wanted to share with you some of the ways I believe institutions could foster student blogging. One of the issues Brian LePort raised was insistence on Google of keeping everything. Google doesn’t actually keep everything, but it does keep a lot and for a long time.

Anyway, to answer some of the questions raises — like who owns the material, etc… — this is what I’d propose:

  1. Create a class blog via one of the blog programs that allow multiple authors or even blogs. This will allow the material created to remain under the domain of the professor if not the institution. This point will help define the following points.
  2. Blogging is not meant to take the place of classroom learning nor classroom participation. It is merely meant to supplement it. To insure the student engages in the classroom, the professor should require blogging but likewise limit blogging. Require a certain number of blog posts or other online engagement, because by doing so you also may reserve the right to limit engagement.
  3. Allow your students to blog their classroom assignment and/or experience. However, as I was cautioned by one of my professors, do not allow them to mention other students.
  4. Encourage early and often online publication via the various online journals and magazines such as Bible and Interpretation and The Marginalia Review. While many may be turned down at first, learning how to write for a wider audience will only benefit them in the end.
  5. Become a blogger

Thoughts?

Wesley’s Rules for Blogging – Stay in Love with God

Stay in Love With God

How does this apply to us, especially those who are other atheist or agnostic, or who simply do not want to engage in theology?

The Wesleyan premise was pretty simple. He looked over the landscape and saw the Anglican Church abandoning the poor in favor of themselves and their own power structures. They had lost the love of God as exhibited in their works to others. They knew God and in many ways served God but simply did not love God. They were themselves the object of their love.

Bloggers can become a self-obsessed lot, blogging more about themselves than any previous outside goals. There are some blogs who are established to deliver information only about the author. There is no engagement, no comments. They exist a website that updates on a regular basis. As a Christian who believes blogging can be a ministry, I find pay sites (especially those designed as a ministry) appalling. What is the love here? What is the direction of the love?

I want to broadly interpret this rule for those who may not necessarily believe. Stay in love with something other than yourself. This provides something of an accountability to your blogging. If you are no longer blogging just to hear yourself speak, then you will blog more responsible. As a Christian, if your blog does not showcase the love of God in some way, then you may be doing it wrong.

Wesley’s Rules for Blogging – Do Good

Wesley’s Second Rule is:

Do Good.

This rule is even further detailed by Wesley:

Do all the good you can, By all the means you can, In all the ways you can, in all the
places you can, at all the times you can, to all the people you can, as long as ever you can.

Today, blogging is held in a vastly different land. There are free sites, but many are moving to the self-hosted arena. To this end, I try to offer server space and help to new bloggers just starting. I try to share their links on my blog, twitter, and various facebook pages/walls. Why? Because I have no need to insure I am the only voice, but believe the true democratization of blogging will help increase our field and help in combating the sheer stupidity of the internet.

Do all the good you can

Blogging has the capability of doing something rather good. We see this all the time on “mommy blogs” and other niches. Biblioblogging has seen some great moments as well. When someone is fired unjustly, we respond. We someone suffers loss, we respond. When one blogger found most of his books destroyed by mold, people from all over the world responded with donations. We highlight each another’s accomplishments. We help to promote each other. We also help to call attention to injustices.

“Doing Good” is the easiest thing a blogger can do because it takes nothing to create a post highlighting injustice, sharing charitable giving sites, or even posting a note of good cheer once a week.

Just think about the voice your blog can give to the Good in this world. Specifically, you can do good for your fellow bloggers. Start there. Help to call attention to new blogs. Share you knowledge. Promote the books of your fellow bloggers. Help to call attention to specific issues that need to be address, even if on a worldwide stage. Another way is to help them by visiting their Amazon stores. Seriously, there is almost no limit on the amount of good you can do with a blog.