Category Archives: Logos Bible Software

Review, @Logos’s “The John Wesley Collection”

English: "John Wesley," by the Engli...
Oh yeah… I’ve been digitzed. English: “John Wesley,” by the English artist George Romney, oil on canvas. 29 1/2 in. x 24 3/4 in. Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is a growing need and hunger among those people who call themselves Methodist to understand better John Wesley. Perhaps this need is first introduced because they hear something they don’t think is quite right. Or maybe they finally experience a good theological discussion of what it means to be Wesleyan — infallibility, class meeting, holy conferencing and the like. Or maybe they are just new to the denomination and want to understand what (gently) separates us from others. Regardless, across the United States there is a move gaining ground that seeks to look once more to the founder of Methodism in hopes that we can reclaim something of our Wesleyan roots.

The “John Wesley Collection” from Logos contains 26 volumes of writings by John Wesley. These include his journals, letters, his notes upon the New Testament, as well as his sermons. (There is also a multi-volume biographical set included as well, bringing the total number of volumes in this package to 29). As many will know, Wesley’s sermons and New Testament biblical commentary are part of the doctrinal standards of The United Methodist Church. Perhaps each member of the UMC would do well to have this handy as they approach any sort of business meeting.

Like other Logos products, the “John Wesley Collection” comes ready to be explored and synced up to other Logos attributes, such as timelines and maps. Bible verses are likewise hyperlinked so that one can follow Fr. John easy enough as he exegetes and uses Scripture in his daily life. Unlike print copy reproductions, it is easy to read on your notebook or other portable device.

One of the highlights of this collection is the immediacy of information. I can search the times Wesley used “baptism” or “communion” as well as use topic searches to see how he felt about Calvinists and Americans. I can read (and use) what Wesley wrote not just as a proof-text, but in context and — more importantly — along a timeline. As most Wesleyan scholars know, Fr. John was not the same at the end of this life as he was at the beginning. He grew. So, we can find out when and what he said and place it on a graph, charting such growth. It really is a fascinating way to examine the beliefs of Fr. John, watching a mind shaped by his experiences, grapple with the things set before him.

I would highly recommend this set, especially for those Methodists who are still Wesleyan.

in the (e)mail from @logos – The John Wesley Collection

English:
I’m digital, baby – John Wesley

As many of us get ready for our Annual Conferences and then the General Conference, it would behoove us to go back and reread, relearn, or even learn the first time Wesley’s thoughts, theology, and heart. Granted, only his sermons and notes on Scripture are part of the Doctrinal Standards of the United Methodist Church, but I think the entire Wesleyan Corpus should help us grow as Christians and Wesleyans, even if they are not Standard.

So, that’s why I am beyond thankful Logos has sent me the collection of Wesley’s works (this goes beyond his sermons and letters, but into his works (letters) and journals:

The John Wesley Collection (29 vols.) contains all of his theological works, including the four-volume Explanatory Notes upon the Old and New Testaments, plus his journals, essays, letters, sermons, grammars, psalms, hymns, and addresses. Those familiar with the Thomas Jackson edition of The Works of John Wesley are aware they include some of his journals, but these are incomplete and missing large chunks of important entries—sometimes entire years are missing! The Logos edition of the John Wesley Collection (29 vols.) contains the unabridged and authoritative eight-volume journals edited by Nehemiah Curnock. Also included in this massive collection is a three-volume, in-depth biography on this extraordinary man of faith.

I cannot wait to dig into these works!

Review, “Transformation, The Heart of Paul’s Gospel” @logos @lexhampress

Have we missed St. Paul’s message… the proverbial forest for the trees?

During the debate between New Perspective, Old Perspective, and everything else about Paul’s intellectual origin, what may get lost is Paul’s goal of the Gospel. In a new book, the first in a series edited by renowned Pauline Third-Way scholar, Michael F. Bird, David A. deSilva proposes that at the center of Paul’s message is one simple concept: transformation.

The goal of Transformation: The Heart of Paul’s Gospel is simple: “to propose a way of thinking about Paul’s gospel — a vision for what God is seeking to bring about through the death and resurrection of his Son, the indwelling of his Spirit, and his future intervention in cosmic affairs.” (pg 5) While deSilva writes with an evangelical perspective in mind, his reach extends to others as well, especially with the centerpiece of his tripodic proposal. Indeed, the indwelling of the Spirit is what makes up the idea of transformation.

The book is divided into four chapters. The first chapter is deSilva’s case for a “broader understanding of Paul’s Gospel of Transformation.” He is hesitant about assigning too wide a gulf between justification and sanctification. He points to several Christian traditions that highlight one over the other. He posits that Paul would be troubled at the separation and a creation of “an order of salvation.” Indeed, I think we should be too. He argues five points against such a false separation (pg 10), all of which sound Wesleyan (if I may be so biased). Indeed, deSilva suggests an ongoing justification, from the initial acquittal to the “final justification.” For Wesleyans, we see this act as the journey of grace, albeit with three stages of grace (prevenient, justifying, and sanctifying). Regardless of my bias, the thesis is simple: There is no momentary act of salvation, but an ongoing changing of the person into the new creation, and thus, transformation. For the rest of chapter 1, deSilva lays out well the reasons why his five points are sound, calling on Scripture and Reason (scholarship) to aid him. He explores the “why” of transformation (i.e., God shows no partiality) and delves into the debate of what justification actually means.

Paul-iconChapter 2 turns to explore what transformation means to the individual and to the individual’s freedom within Christ. He begins, again, but setting the initial act of justification within the framework of the entire Christian journey. Paul simply does not spend a lot of time detailing this theological point, but rather spends a majority of his time instructing the Church what this means and how this looks (how transformation looks) in the body (and the body made up of individuals).

In chapter 3, deSilva explores the community’s transformation as individuals who are opposed to one another in life become conformed to a unified body. Yes, reconciliation is a part of the transformation which is the heart of Paul’s message (at least according to deSilva). So is ecumenicalism, it seems. I dare say, this chapter is important to the overall concept of Christian unity. This chapter speaks to me as one who believes heavily in John 17 as a mission for today’s Christian. The final chapter is deSilva’s answer to contemporary eschatological enterprises and, I think, empire criticism. It is a rewarding chapter, but one that is best not explained in a review.

I was apprehensive about this book. When I begin an introduction of a book on Paul’s message by exploring the Roman Road(s), I am easily turned off of the subject matter. However, I am glad my first, brief, and uninformed opinions were wrong. There is no hero worship of Paul, NT Wright, or Luther, only a straightforward and enticing examination of the heart of Paul’s message. The more I read, the more I enjoyed it. The more I read, the more I learned. The more I read, the more my opinion of Paul and post-Reformation views on Justification were…well, transformed.

I cannot help but to read books on justification and sanctification as a Wesleyan — and as one attempting to, occasionally, write a dissertation on the atonement mechanism in Paul’s Epistle to the Galatians. I see a lot of my views of Wesley’s views in this book, and not least because deSilva quotes the 39 Articles and refers to Wesley several times. I think I see a connection between Wesley and this book because of what I perceive as the ongoing work of Grace in the life of the Christian, which deSilva assures us is the heart of Paul’s message. I would encourage all Wesleyans (and Arminians) to pick up a copy of this book as a way to build their own personal theology. I would equally suggest all others read this book to understand better what other Christians feel about the journey of grace, but grounded only in Paul’s writings. Finally, those of us interested in Christian unity should at the very least read chapter 1 and chapter 4, first to understand the heart of Paul’s mission and second to understand how this applies to us today as we try to build Christian unity.

This book is available in several different formats from Amazon, Logos, and Lexham Press.

Book Notice: “Transformation: The Heart of Paul’s Gospel” @logos

Self-portrait as the Apostle Paul (by Rembrandt)
Self-portrait as the Apostle Paul (by Rembrandt) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I saw this on Pre-Pub and I got it. Now that it is out, the price is a bit more, but it is worth it. I intend to review it in the coming weeks. Just wanted to highlight it for you.

From Logos:

The Apostle Paul found the gospel message so compelling that he became a rootless wanderer and endured hardships and deprivation to spread this good news throughout the Roman Empire. What was the “gift of righteousness” that Paul was so eager to share? David deSilva argues that it was far richer than the “get out of hell free” pass that some Christians have unintentionally reduced it to today.

In Transformation: The Heart of Paul’s Gospel, deSilva guides readers in expanding their definition of the gospel message as presented in Paul’s letters. He succinctly demonstrates that the gift of righteousness that Paul speaks of in Romans is nothing less than the means to transform and renew all of creation—including ourselves. Join deSilva as he explores Paul’s message of change and renewal, and prepare to be transformed in your own thinking in the process.

The Snapshots series, edited by renowned scholar Michael Bird, engages significant issues in contemporary biblical scholarship, making them accessible to busy students of the Word and applicable in the life of the church.

The @Logos Digital Hymnal in #Logos6

I am not a singer, but I do like the idea of having a small hymnal at my whim. Plus, this gives me hope of including denominational hymnals one day. Anyway, it plays MIDI files, includes images of the hymns (words and music) as well as printed words. You can find it here.

Here is a screenshot:

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 11.28.10 AM

The MIDI’s are not available on iOS, however, but honestly… MIDI’s should be used for 2 things: Geocities and hearing the tune.