Category Archives: Technology

Holy moly – something I discovered about @AccordanceBible

lamp_finalThe package I am reviewing includes the New English Translation of the Septuagint, a favorite of mine.

I opened Accordance this morning to search the NETS for Isaiah 9.5 (9.6 ENG).

because a child was born for us, a son also given to us, whose sovereignty was upon his shoulder, and he is named Messenger of Great Counsel, for I will bring peace upon the rulers, peace and health to him.

What I was surprised to discover is that where I closed off last time is exactly where it opened up this time.

accordance 8.18

To show you what I mean, I worked a little, closed it, and then opened it again.

Accordance 8.19

My workspace, even down to the dimensions of the tool bar, opened back up.

DO YOU KNOW HOW MUCH TIME THAT SAVES ME???!?!?!?

One thing I would like to know, however, is where is the front matter on the NETS (which, in my opinion, makes the NETS invaluable for LXX research)?

@AccordanceBible 11 — (customer service & sync & search) Features Overview

lamp_finalI wanted to really sit down and focus on Accordance, so I’ve done so during the past few weeks. Before I go on, let me point you to the features page in Accordance 11.

I noticed that after I had not opened Accordance for 7 days, I needed to go online to validate it. This means that I could not get my Mac, my iPad, or my iPhone (even 3g) to sync and thus validate my credentials. It simply wouldn’t work. If someone is using this in an area with little or no internet connection, they are going to have a bad time. When I spoke with Billy at Support, he told me this was a known issue and should be solved shortly. Indeed, he sent me a new download and it is virtually solved.

One of the key issues is customer service. If I cannot contact you, if I cannot talk to you, if you don’t know what I’m talking about — or worse, pretend you don’t, and then don’t share other experiences — I will not invest with you. I tweeted last night, after hours, to Accordance and they promptly responded. I called first this morning and they walked me through it and explained what the problem really was. Honesty is the best policy.

Let’s not kid ourselves. This is an investment into something that will take you longer to learn how to use than to buy. Great service is really a major selling point.

My biggest complaint thus far? Simply, I have to have wifi to sync. The sync feature is nice, because it allows you to carry your notes everywhere, to pick up where you put the book down, and to waste no time getting back to the subject you were studying. Remember, this software is designed for pastors and students, neither of which are usually stationary. But, I wish I could sync with 3g.

One of the features I really like is the way you can categorize your resources. This comes in handy when, say, I want to organize my Greek sources or, in the future, my Wesleyan resources. If I want to create a category removing all devotional material, without removing them from my library, I can do that so that I no longer have to worry about having them searched. I can create a category, say for Wesleyan modules/tools, and search only that category. I can, perhaps, discover that Outler improperly named the third leg “Experience” when he should have named it “Assurance.”

tools

Speaking of searches, Accordance has 2 types of search available to us. The first is flex. It allows you to take a shot in the dark. It is like google, but for the bible. What I mean is this: you ever think you know what you want to search for, but do not know how it is phrased? Sometimes, searches require you to make an accurate guess. I rarely ever get this to work for me because I am always hearing things differently. I mean, if you read Scripture in a variety of translations, you will eventually mesh this together. Flex search prevents that and allows you to look for close connections to what you are searching. It also changes numbers and senses so you aren’t stuck with “search for plane” (when you mean “search on the planes”).

The second type is the exact search. When they say fast, they mean fast. Granted, my library is (for now) small, but the search feature seems almost instantaneous. Added to this, you can modify the exact search to look for tags, syntax, and other varieties. This is not the flex search, as it is really geared to the original languages.

A related feature is the topic search. Thank of Nave’s, but better and faster. A lot faster. Sort of like a highway in Montana. You type in a topic — say, baptism. You will get verses associated with baptism (ranging from dipping to baptism). If there isn’t a topic exactly like you want, there are usually others provided that come close to it. Accordance bills this as perfect for topical preachers. That’s fair, but it is also helpful for students who want to follow a thought around Scripture while working on their dissertation. This feature is actually new in Accordance 11.

Screen Shot 2014-12-04 at 10.25.25 AM

Accordance’s search features are a thing of beauty. They are fast, agile, and responsive to the pastor and student. It is no wonder concordances are almost a thing of the past…

Here are some screen shots of the various searches (flex and exact):

exact search plane esv
Exact Search “Plane” on ESV
flex search dip NETS
Flex Search “DIP” on NETS
flex search plane esv
Flex Search “Plane” ESV

in the (e)mail form @AccordanceBible – Accordance 11

lamp_finalThanks to Accordance for sending me this software bundle. I’ll speak more about what is in it later. Warning, this is my first Accordance package, so I cannot compare it to 10 or below. My focus will be on the ease of Accordance and what it can do (learning curve, basic operation, etc…). This is the collection I am working with. For those who want to see what is new in Accordance 11, see here.

First, straight out of the box, it downloaded, installed, and “indexed” quick, easy, and without pain to my Mac. Another thing? I get to use Dropbox to store some data.

I am going to spend some considerable amount of time with it over the next few weeks. So, I encourage you to ask questions — what do you look for in a study software platform? Why do you think you need/don’t need it?

For me, the “why” is very simple. Because of the volume of information out there, I need something that will help compile it. I need something I can carry with me. I need a roving library. I don’t really do sermon prep — mainly because when I do preach, I will use the lectionary. But I do do a lot of study and research. So, I need something that aids me in this.

From Accordance,

For the Student

  • Forget Pen and Paper: Highlight and add notes to any book.
  • Leave the Books at Home: Accordance links your grammars and textbooks directly to the Bible.
  • Cite Your Sources: Get instant bibliographic info when you copy and paste.

For the Teacher/Professor

  • Go to the Sources: Explore Biblical Greek and Hebrew, Dead Sea Scrolls, Rabbinics, Church Fathers, and more.
  • Trust Your Materials: Accordance offers research-grade texts and scholarly tools.
  • Present Your Findings: Enhance your teaching with stunning visuals and export options.

Equally, I have downloaded the iOS app for both my iPhone 5c and iPad 3. It is nicely streamed lined on those devices as well.

Again, let me say that I am impressed with this native Mac platform. More to come.

The @Logos Digital Hymnal in #Logos6

I am not a singer, but I do like the idea of having a small hymnal at my whim. Plus, this gives me hope of including denominational hymnals one day. Anyway, it plays MIDI files, includes images of the hymns (words and music) as well as printed words. You can find it here.

Here is a screenshot:

Screen Shot 2014-11-07 at 11.28.10 AM

The MIDI’s are not available on iOS, however, but honestly… MIDI’s should be used for 2 things: Geocities and hearing the tune.

Case-frames in Logos 6 #Logos6

First of all, Joel told me that I should post here because no one reads my blog. And that’s not very nice. But, he’s probably right. And, once I changed his blog’s tagline to “Where Joel incessantly brain vomits nonsense into cyberspace” for an entire day without him noticing while letting everyone else in on the gag.  So I suppose we’re even.

At any rate, I’m cross posting. I’ve written a post on my personal blog about what I’ve been up to for the past year, namely working on the new case-frames feature in Logos 6. Here’s a teaser and you can read the rest HERE:

Rick has already posted some of his favorite features in Logos 6. So, I thought I’d take some time to post on my favorite feature in Logos 6 while also mimicking his post title. Incidentally, I’m biased because I worked on the Hebrew data for this project. Paul Danove (whose work really inspired this feature) provided initial Greek data, and Mike Aubrey continued that work.

Case-frames provide a new way of exploring meaning within Logos 6. It may not be apparent on first glance how they do this. Here I will work from an English example to an original language example to demonstrate how this works.

Consider an English verb like “return.” This verb can have several different meanings as in the following sentences:

  1. He returned home.
  2. He returned the donkey to its pen.

In the first case, we might paraphrase “return” as “go back”: “He went back home.” In the second, we might somewhat poorly paraphrase as “bring back” (perhaps this isn’t the only possible interpretation, but this is only an example): “He brought the donkey back to its pen.”

The difference in these two meanings of “return” is reflected in the number of “arguments” that the verb takes in each example …

 

The new Visual Creator in #Logos6 is awesome @logos

I made this:

John Wesley Quote

Let me show you how:

There is so much you can do with this feature, both church and academy.

  • It’s going to be a great tool for us bloggers
  • Teachers and Preachers can use it for teaching via media.

the inline search in #logos6 @logos (snapshot)

Not only did I, perhaps, get to beta test this, I am now reviewing it.

One of the coolest, quickest features I really like is the addition of the in-line search. This allows you to search, from the same screen, the text before you.

inline search 1
Look for the little magnifying glass
inline search 2
type in your favorite word, sound, or name of your best friend

There you go.

I know this sounds like a “duh” addition, but it is new and I’ve used it daily when searching for a text.

Mark 9.49 in #Logos 6 (@Logos) (Lexham Textual Notes + Ancient Lit. Database)

You’ll just have to deal with me for a minute. I am not a sales rep nor do I participate in the Logos Affiliate program. More power to those bloggers who do. I would rather not, so that at least in appearance, I can presume to give you unbiased advice. I say this because I am biased to serious bible study and I believe you can actually get serious through Logos.

For instance, there is a textual variant in Mark 9.49 that I like to play around with from time to time. I believe it points to a time of rehabilitation after….well, I’ll leave it there for the moment.

First, I start with the Lexham Textual Notes on the Bible. This is a commentary on the entire bible and the textual variants found therein. Rick Brannon, one of my favorite people and one of the editors/authors of this volume, writes,

The Lexham Textual Notes on the Bible (LTNB) cover both the Old Testament (Hebrew Bible) and New Testament with over 2,000 notes. These notes are situated somewhere between what is found in footnotes in modern English Bibles and the sort of material covered by Bruce Metzger’s Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament. But the discussion in LTNB is geared toward readers with little to no text-critical knowledge. The goal is to provide English translations of several important variation units and some brief non-technical but relevant information about the unit.

In the LTNB, I go to Mark 9.49:

Mark 9.49 LTNB
The Hebrew is the text used for the OT, although briefing scanning the document I see references to the LXX. The LXX is used to help in examining Hebrew readings.

As you can see, there is a difference, although some may argue against it being that much of a difference. I mean, unless you want to argue for purgatory or something…

After this, because I’m not satisfied, I go to the Ancient Literature Database. When this first started, the references were something like 60,000 but now, it racing past 180,000 entries. So, what do I come up with?

Mark 9.49 Ancient Lit Database

The Testament of Levi reads,

And of all thy first-fruits and of wine offer the first, as a sacrifice to the Lord God; and every sacrifice thou shalt salt with salt.

If I wanted to go further, I could commentaries, but these two things helps to make a reasonably informed decision.

How can I get it?

The Lexham Textual Notes on the Bible is included in Logos 6 Base Packages at Gold and higher, and Extended Crossgrade.

a quick snapshot and video of the Canon Comparisons in #Logos6 @logos

I am doing a Fouetté rond de jambe en tournant right now because of this new feature.

First, the video:

Now, some screen shots:

Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 11.42.14 AM Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 11.40.59 AM Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 11.40.54 AM Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 11.40.50 AM Screen Shot 2014-10-27 at 11.39.37 AM

#Logos6 is out, finally… or maybe #Logos^? @logos

New tools logos 6

I may have been among some of those beta testing the new Logos 6 engine. Right now, my engine is updating so I will have to have time to let it index, etc…

But I wanted to call your attention to it immediately.

  1. The teaching versatility of the software has taken a gigantic leap. Not only are their visual tools like Canon Comparison and character charters (you’ll see), but visualizers that help you see the meaning of the verse, etc… Likewise, you can now make slides out of verses or other short passages you find in your books. This is going to be great for pastors and teachers who make use of multimedia in your preaching/classrooms
  2.  The ancient text database is going to be a must for all of those researching literary sources and developments of the text. I can see two people using this. One, those who are researching where texts come from and two, how a text was preserved or modified. Quite simply, this tool is going to cut work in half for those of us in these peoples. If you are looking at how a verse was used in the Church Fathers, you are going to be amazed at the level you uncover.

So yes, maybe the exponent sign (^) is really what they should have used.

Over at Patheos: Progressive Brands, Sexism & DudeBro Politics: #CloseGamerGate

link to original post: here

Because this was now being handled in public, I was fortunate to receive the support of hundreds of people on Twitter – as well as attacks from others. I always expect some form of trolling, but I did not expect one of the attackers to be an editor at Salon, Elias Isquith, who questioned what my potential rape meant for “hashtags” and “brands”. “- Sarah Kendzior, On Being A Thing

Encountering the Emergent Church Brand

For a span of 2 years, my final semester of undergrad up until my second year in seminary,I tried and miserably failed to fit myself in the white Calvinist evangelical mold. As a black man in his early twenties, I didn’t fit in anywhere in predominantly white Christian educational settings. Some of my first friends in seminary were a group of white Christians who were well read with Emergent Christian literature: Tony Jones, Doug Paggit, Rob Bell, and Brian McLaren will all names that were dropped during our weekly Tuesday night taco dinners.  I would eventually leave the Neo-Calvinist movement on my own terms and started to see some freedom in the Emergent Church movement. Two of the more influential books on my journey were Scot McKnight’s The Jesus Creed and Donald Miller’s Blue Like Jazz. My Calvinist friends (who had not read these book/authors) were calling me a heretic for even reading these books, and as I look back then seven years ago, I can laugh.

I once preached a sermon on the Emergent church as the future of Christian tradition, and I even taught a Sunday School class on Black theology and Emergence Christianity.  However, I began to experience disaffection with the Emergent Church. All of the topics and controversies that the EC leadership wrote about/spoke about still made Whiteness as the center. Believers from marginated contexts were welcome to the table as long as they tacitly submitted to the ways of the dominant culture. In essence,  Emergence Christianities have become more about personal brands and the platforms of their recognized overwhelmingly White male leaders rather than being about the “future of Christianity.” You see, since we only live in the here and now, all talks of the “future of Christianity” are speculative. Yet, there is much money to be made when small groups of people decide to severe the multiracial Kingdom of God from any notion of the future. The “future” winds up looking very much like the status quo, and defenses (yes, even “progressive ones”) of the status quo are quite profitable.

Liberationist Killjoys And DudeBro Christianity

At Killjoy Prophets, there is a two-fold mission: first, we desire to center the experiences of Women of Color in Christianity, and secondly, we work to end DudeBro Christianity. Now, we often get asked, “what is DudeBro Christianity?” First of all, DudeBro is a descriptor of character traits; it is a politics in which any person of any gender, sexual orientation, or ethnic background can embody.  DudeBro Christianity is the passive embodiment of dominant cultural norms that conceal commitments to White supremacist and male supremacist narratives as defaults. The bodies of women and People of Color are made to be objects of contempt. The practice of DudeBro Politics includes someone who insists that all social encounters occur on their terms.  The future of Christianity is their private property (“post-Christendom”); like the plantation oligarchs, People of Color and the bodies of women are to be supervised by DudeBro Christian leaders.

Emergent Christian leaders often make excuses such as, well many PoC and women just do not have a big enough platform to draw a big enough crowd for conferences. In other words, profit is the driving force behind abstract discussions of “the future” rather than the Kingdom of God, which is justice, and peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit.  DudeBro Politics is the anti-Christ, posing as an angelic voice of progressive Enlightenment in order to deny faithful victory over the sins of White Supremacy, rape culture, and economic exploitation. DudeBro politics can play out in non-liberating events such as a White Cisgender queer male informing me that I use too strong of language when describing economic policies as anti-black racism. DudeBro Christianity is when for the sake of inclusion in the United Methodist Church, a White CisHet man uses his privilege to compare the General Conference to date rape. In order to build her brand as a magenta politics leftist, one political theologian dismissed Sarah Kendzior’s claims to being threatened with rape. Jason is right: in order for DudeBro Politics to remain the pre-eminent regime in this kyriarchal, White Supremacist economy, men have to control the bodies of women and PoC.

“but I think it’s pathetic for some [recognized Emergent Church leaders] to stand around and comment on the failings [of Mark Driscoll/Mars Hill Church], while cowardly never admitting your own sh*& (which is strikingly familiar!!) misogyny, mental and emotional abuse all hidden behind a new found liberalism and feminism because the times they are a changin’, jumping on the same sex marriage band wagon because its the hot new ride in town, and you just might get to be relevant again…these people are very cunning and smart and they will use anything (theology, controversy, sensationalism) and anyone to get ahead. it’s a clinical diagnosis and a pathology that looks like this kind of carnage, and they ALWAYS leave bodies in their wake. soliciting white male leaders of the emergent church willing to cover it all up for their crony. wipe out evidence on organizations website. lies and betrayal.”- Julie McMahon, comment, Tony Jones On Mark Driscoll, What Came First, The Thug or The Theology?

On Ending DudeBro Christianity, #GamerGate, & #NotYourShield

Emergence Christianities and their leadership has unfortunately found itself more often than not on imperialist quests for fame and fortune rather than being in solidarity with the least of these. In the process, as Julie McMahon pointed out, brand-creation and marketing leave the bodies of the marginalized in its wake: objectification, emotional, physical and mental abuse, gaslighting, racist microaggressions, and “post-modern” defenses of White Supremacy. Progressive spaces such as Emergence Christianity have made it okay for others to promote themselves at the expense of others (women mostly). For example, the whole #GamerGate #NotYourShield movement is a whole group of gamer dudes violently backlashing against women gamers who have spoken up versus misogyny. Last week, my friend Drew Hart discovered that a #NotYourShield sock puppet had been using a picture of his to advance the racist*, sexist agenda of #NotYourShield / #GamerGate.

#GamerGate is more than a few Internet trolls. They harass their critics, take down their blogsites, spread vicious rumors, and send emails promising gun violence and sexual assaults towards women who dare speak out. It’s time for progressives to find new ways to brand themselves, and this should start by rejecting DudeBro Politics. It means living by the preferential option for the marginalized (women & People of Color), preferring to choose human life and people over profiteering and brand-making.  Such a rejection also means a public rebuke of #GamerGate / #NotYourShield.    #CloseGamerGate #CloseGamerGate #CloseGamerGate

“[…] upon this rock I will build my church; the gates of hell will not prevail against it.”- Matthew 16:18 KJV

Buffy the Vampire Slayer, “The Gift”
  • I refer to #GamerGate/ #NotYourShield as racist because of #1, the persistent blackface sock puppeteering that they do, and #2, their reliance on negative stereotypes of Blacks as thuggish, criminal, and culturally “backwards”/homophobic.