Books / NIV

In the Mail: @Zondervan’s “The Greek-English New Testament: UBS 5th Revised Edition and NIV”

This really is a beautiful bible and matches up quite well to the other Greek bibles/helps. &lt;br /&gt;<br /> The most widely used edition of the Greek New Testament and the most widely read contemporary English Bible translation are now available in one volume! Featuring the UBS 5 critical text (with the full apparatus) and the New International Version, this reference volume stands to become the standard edition for translators and students. Like the 28th edition of the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, the UBS 5 text is the leading edition of the original text of the New Testament. It

Books / Logos Bible Software

Review, @LexhamPress’s “Supernatural: What the Bible teaches about the unseen world and why it matters.”

What do we do with all of the “weird” stuff in Scripture? This is a serious question for Christians today. Many ignore it, reenacting a poor caricature of Rudolf Bultmann, ignoring all mythic language from Scripture — and from Christian Tradition. Are we embarrassed in our modern world of talk of spirits, angels, and demons? Have we become so entrenched in post-modern monotheism that we forget about the other heavenly bodies? As a Bible scholar, I’ve learned that strange passages (and lots of other little-known and little-understood parts of Scripture) are actually very important. They teach specific ideas about

Books / Logos Bible Software

in the mail from @LexhamPress, “Supernatural: What the Bible teaches about the unseen world and why it matters”

The newest work from Dr. Michael Heiser is out. Dr. Michael S. Heiser, a Scholar-in-Residence at Faithlife Corporation, presents fifteen years of research on what the Bible really says about the unseen world of the supernatural unfiltered by tradition or by theological presuppositions. People shouldn’t be protected from the Bible, Dr. Michael S. Heiser says, but theological systems often do just that, by explaining away difficult or troublesome passages of Scripture because their literal meaning doesn’t fit into our tidy systems. Who were the sons of God ? Who were the Nephilim? Where do angels fit into the supernatural


Book Notes, @ivpacademic’s “Spirit of God: Christian Renewal in the Community of Faith “

While at times dense and jargon-laced, these essays are perhaps what the cautious rationalist needs to start toe-dipping into the fires of the Spirit. There are swatches of useful concepts – see especially Amos Young’s “pneumato-personalistic theology of creation”. Estrelda Alexanders renders a gorgeous explanation of why so many attempt to distance themselves from perceived pagan influences and Barbeau perhaps gives the most concise descriptions of the “Aldersgate” incident and the surrounding psychobiographies and clips from journals I’ve seen. If you’re currently mired in the academia and thinking of taking the Holy Spirit out for a test drive and


Book Review, @ivpacademic’s “Rediscovering Jesus: An Introduction to Biblical, Religious and Cultural Perspectives on Christ”

I am left to wonder, because of the proposed premise of this book, if we aren’t left with a more hidden Jesus than before. The second half of the book makes the book worthwhile. It examines the Jesuses of different religions, including the Gnostic, Muslim and American (yes, I did call “American” a religion). In this, the authors (while presenting an evangelical outlook) tackle what Christianity would be if, say, the Mormon Jesus of Joseph Smith, was the dominant Jesus. This “Jesus Outside the Bible” should be expanded more, giving special attention to various other Jesus projects (including the Quest


In the Mail, @OUPAcademic’s “We Gather Together – The Religious Right and the Problem of Interfaith Politics”

Don’t you think this is timely? The story of the birth of the Religious Right is a familiar one. In the 1970s, mainly in response to Roe v. Wade, evangelicals and conservative Catholics put aside their longstanding historical prejudices and theological differences and joined forces to form a potent political movement that swept across the country. In this provocative book, Neil J. Young argues that almost none of this is true. Young offers an alternative history of the Religious Right that upends these widely-believed myths. Theology, not politics, defined the Religious Right. The rise of secularism, pluralism, and cultural

Books / NLT

Review, “@TyndaleHouse Select NLT: Select Reference Edition”

For the bibliophile, there is barely anything more joyful than a finely pieced book. Yes, it is about the interior, but so too the exterior. In fact, bibliophiles know you can judge a book by its cover. There is also a select group of bibliophiles who do more than collect books, but so too collect bibles. I myself have numerous hard copies of the Scriptures, in different translations, with different covers, in different editions. There are two holding top-tier in my collection. The first is the Cambridge KJV with Apocrypha. It is black calfskin leather. The second is a