Isaiah / New Testament / Old Testament / etc.

On γαρ’d: touché

Here’s the full paper from the HBU Theology Conference. To be read at SBL2014.  

Bible Translation / Church History / Debate/Discussion / etc.

On γαρ’d

Douglas Campbell’s Deliverance of God has generated lots of discussion, especially on Romans 1:18-32. The γαρ in 1:18 has been a problem for interpreters long before Campbell came to it. But Campbell’s work is making folks take another look at the particle in this verse. Koine “traditionalists” (is there a better word?) assert that γαρ is a discourse connector which logically joins two parts of a discourse, normally in an explanatory way.  This sense is typically translated “therefore”. Example: I have a broken leg, therefore I will not be playing football. If one only reads the NT, then clearly this is the most


Isaiah 53: Does Jesus claim to be Messiah?

The ancient prophet Isaiah predicted the coming of a servant of the Lord, a deliverer for the nations, with graphic detail about the servant’s appearance and mortal suffering. Join Dr. Michael Rydelnik, Dr. Michael Brown, Dr. Walter Kaiser, and Dr. Darrell Bock as they engage in a captivating discussion to unlock the mysteries of one of the most fascinating passages of Scripture, Isaiah 53. You’ll gain insights from the Jewish and Christian perspectives as you examine the interpretations and implications. Discover and explore the clues that help to reveal the mystery of this passage of Scripture. If you recognize

Books / Isaiah

Review: The Gospel According to Isaiah 53: Encountering the Suffering Servant in Jewish and Christian Theology

I am not opposed to reading books such as this one. It is more difficult for those who are more academically inclined than they are evangelically inclined, but if we separate the Church from the Academy, both will perish. Bock’s book is a collection of essays by those who believe that Jesus is the Messiah, and more, that Jesus is the Suffering Servant of Isaiah 53. Most, if not all, come from a more evangelical approach to Scripture than I am used to (Isaiah was written by one author, prophecies are about future events), but where this remains controversial


Isaiah 3.1-7 as a paratext with the Elijah-Elisha narratives?

Just a thought or two on this and then back to work… Need to put this on “paper…” The Lord, the LORD of hosts, shall take away from Jerusalem and from Judah support and prop (all supplies of bread and water): Famine – 2 Kings 2.38-44; 6.25-33 Hero and warrior, judge and prophet, fortune-teller and elder, Oh come on… that is just too easy… The captain of fifty and the nobleman, counselor, skilled magician, and expert charmer. Captain of fifty – 2 Kings 1.9-15 I will make striplings their princes; the fickle shall govern them, Ahab anyone? And the

Books / Isaiah

In the Mail: The Gospel According to Isaiah 53: Encountering the Suffering Servant in Jewish and Christian Theology

The Gospel According to Isaiah 53 presents the redemptive work of the Messiah to the Jewish community, exploring issues of atonement and redemption in light of Isaiah chapter 53. It is clear that Jesus fulfills the specifications of the suffering servant of Isaiah 53. This book has many potential uses in its presentation of the gospel for Jewish people. Pastors who study it will find unparalleled help in preparing Bible studies and sermons, so that their listeners will become better equipped to tell Jewish people about Jesus. It will be beneficial as supplemental reading for classes on Isaiah, the

Intertextuality / Isaiah / Mark / etc.

Following up on Isaiah 65.1-7 and Mark 5.1-20

As we turn to the exegesis of Mark 5.1-20, which I have already weighted heavily with the idea that Mark is using mimesis to undue Vespasian’s actions in Gadara and Simon bar Giora’ claims, it is necessary that I examine the normative source for a Gospel writer, the Jewish Prophets. The Gospel writers’ use of the Old Testament as a means of showcasing who Jesus is is well documented and must not be overlooked during any exegesis. In Mark, the writer has a formula for introduction when he is using the voices of the Prophets to introduce something which