More on Creation…Keats, Immortality, Theosis

I’ve posted several snippets and quotes from theologians on the reality of Creation. I also posted something from the 19th century poet, John Keats. Except for his suggestion that the Christian faith does not contain the allowance for this “schoolmaster” bit (honestly… stop making suggestions about the Christian faith unless you know all about it), I tend to agree with him. I wanted to add a few thoughts so you can know where I’m going. The goal of creation is to partake of the divine nature… In this way he has given us his promises, great beyond all price,


John Keats on “soul-making”… on the point of Creation

I have search for something…for a statement… on my view of Creation, or rather, the point and goal of it. It begins with Genesis 3 and the tree of the knowledge of good, evil, and everything inbetween. This is it. It sums up well my views, although I believe the “Chrystain” religion is bigger (as is often the case) than our dearest Poet would allow. “…The common cognomen of this world among the misguided and superstitious is ‘a vale of tears’ from which we are to be redeemed by a certain arbitrary interposition of God and taken to Heaven

Clement of Rome / Theology

Pseudo-Clementine on the inborn affection to God the Creator

“But, inasmuch as inborn affection towards God the Creator seemed to suffice for salvation to those who loved Him, the enemy studies to pervert this affection in men, and to render them hostile and ungrateful to their Creator. For I call heaven and earth to witness, that if God permitted the enemy to rage as much as he desires. all men should have perished long ere now; but for His mercy’s sake God doth not suffer him. But if men would turn their affection towards God, all would doubtless be saved, even if for some faults they might seem

Athanasius / Theology

St. Athanasius on Grace because God is Creator

St. Athanasius’s tome, On the Incarnation, was required reading in my seminary. I have to wonder if we wouldn’t better require it as a catechismal reading, and to require it every so often from older Christians as well. In this, we find remnants of Wisdom Christology and a solid notion of theosis. My personal theology of God as Creator — and everything that comes from that, i.e., grace and judgement — is formed from this short book and this section in particular. Herein is no substitutional atonement, but still harkens back to the recapitulation (the re-creation) of St. Irenaeus


T.F. Torrance on God the Father as Creator

Torrance notes that God the Father is referred to as “Father” in two different ways. The first, the transcendent one, is based upon God as Creator. This is my favorite attribute of God, and the one which theology first takes shape. …(W)e think of God the Father as the eternal Creator and Lord of all being and existence, he to whom our Lord referred as ‘the heavenly Father’ and to whom he taught us to pray. He is the Father who cares for all his creatures in such a personal and detailed way that, as he taught in the


doctrine and theology guides biblical interpretation

I found this a few months ago and it laid on my desktop since then. But, it is a good infographic. Why? Because without these things, these necessary scaffolds, biblical interpretation is individualized often used to harm people, forming cults along the way.


Calvinism is Rooted

I cannot explain to you my distaste for this form of deterministic Calvinism. Not only does it require God to send people to hell, but it requires God to cause all things, sin included. This is from John Piper: If he can’t govern that moment, he can’t govern the rest of your life and do the miracles you need for him to do. So you need two things. You need a God who disapproves of the ugliness and you need a God who ordains that all things come to pass and is so sovereign he can take everything —