Good essay on “Big History”

This topic has fascinated me for a while. I won’t take you through the entire essay, as this fellow did, but I will call your attention to it. And urge you to look more into Big History …because as long as we teach history as a story of competing tribes, wars are going to repeat themselves and all the horrors of World War I are going to repeat themselves. I’d stumbled on the same sort of idea: We need a history of humanity… I’ve floated the idea that what I call collective learning may be what makes us different:


the erosion of moral facts?

Are we teaching our children that only “proven” facts can be called right? Indeed, such is the proposition Justin P. McBrayer makes in a NY Times Op-Ed: In summary, our public schools teach students that all claims are either facts or opinions and that all value and moral claims fall into the latter camp. The punchline: there are no moral facts. And if there are no moral facts, then there are no moral truths. via Why Our Children Don’t Think There Are Moral Facts – This is, I think, a result of modernity. The philosopher (one who teaches

Christian Education / Controversial / Philosophy

Unsettled Christianity and Settler Colonialism

Everyone repeats the same line: Sunday is the most segregated day of the week, and remains so. Why does some Christians fight so hard for racial justice, and others do not? This is a question that has been going through my mind a lot recently. God made all human beings in God’s image, the Imago Dei. Every person is of invaluable worth. This is an enduring truth of Christian tradition passed on for centuries. Racism is a denial of not only the Imago Dei in every human being, but also, a denial of Christ’s resurrection. In order for racism


You were meant to read this post

Via the Twitters…


The Moral Responsibility in Determinism?

At a men’s discussion group I get to participate in every now and then, we have started to hammer out some interestings aspects of the free will v. determinism debate. Anyone who knows the debate, knows that it is not as clean cut as the “v” may represent. But, the question came up about determinism and moral responsibility. Unlike moral influences and free will which suggest the person is still ultimately responsible, I am unsure if it is either logical or moral to place upon a pre-determined individual responsibility for his or her actions. If the person is born


More science against the notion of Free Will

Recently, I’ve been involved in several discussions related to Free Will and the such. I do not hold to Free Will or Determinism, but lean to a mixture of both. I do not believe in ultimate determinism (yet), as I believe we do have a few options when presented with a decision. But Free Will is philosophically, logically, scientifically, and theologically impossible. One of the things that fascinates me is the transference of memory via DNA. This corporate and hereditary memory influences our actions. Memories can be passed down to later generations through genetic switches that allow offspring to


Free Will, Determinism, or Compatibilism? (POLL)

Just wanted to get a flavor of where you are at: