Church Government

Pastor as…CEO…Public Theologian… but as prophet?

 For sometime now, there has been an interest in redefining — maybe, reformulating? — the role of pastor. As the mainline churches moved into moral therapeutic deism, pastors became counselors. Now, as churches become overly top heavy, with quotas and diagrams and attendance measures, pastors are told to become something like CEOs. But, in a time of theological and ecclesiastical decay in the West, perhaps we should expect our pastors to become something different. We overuse the word “prophetic,” insisting that this term is applied to the straight white male fighting perceived oppression — although we bristle if it

John of the Cross / The Mystics

St. John of the Cross – Christ is the Final Word, Reading for #Advent

If only… someone… could bring us John… to us Protestants…. The principal reason why the Old Law permitted us to ask questions of God, and why prophets and priests had to seek visions and revelations of God, was because at that time faith had no firm foundation and the law of the Gospel was not yet established; and thus it was necessary that men should enquire of God and that he should speak, whether by words or by visions and revelations or whether by figures and images or by many other ways of expressing His meaning. For all that

John of the Cross / The Mystics

St. John of the Cross – If You Want #advent

If you want the Virgin will come walking down the road pregnant with the holy, and say, “I need shelter for the night, please take me inside your heart, my time is so close.” Then, under the roof of your soul, you will witness the sublime intimacy, the divine, the Christ taking birth forever, as she grasps your hand for help, for each of us is the midwife of God, each of us. Yet there, under the dome of your being does creation come into existence eternally, through your womb, dear pilgrim— the sacred womb in your soul, as


More on Creation…Keats, Immortality, Theosis

I’ve posted several snippets and quotes from theologians on the reality of Creation. I also posted something from the 19th century poet, John Keats. Except for his suggestion that the Christian faith does not contain the allowance for this “schoolmaster” bit (honestly… stop making suggestions about the Christian faith unless you know all about it), I tend to agree with him. I wanted to add a few thoughts so you can know where I’m going. The goal of creation is to partake of the divine nature… In this way he has given us his promises, great beyond all price,


John Keats on “soul-making”… on the point of Creation

I have search for something…for a statement… on my view of Creation, or rather, the point and goal of it. It begins with Genesis 3 and the tree of the knowledge of good, evil, and everything inbetween. This is it. It sums up well my views, although I believe the “Chrystain” religion is bigger (as is often the case) than our dearest Poet would allow. “…The common cognomen of this world among the misguided and superstitious is ‘a vale of tears’ from which we are to be redeemed by a certain arbitrary interposition of God and taken to Heaven

Clement of Rome / Theology

Pseudo-Clementine on the inborn affection to God the Creator

“But, inasmuch as inborn affection towards God the Creator seemed to suffice for salvation to those who loved Him, the enemy studies to pervert this affection in men, and to render them hostile and ungrateful to their Creator. For I call heaven and earth to witness, that if God permitted the enemy to rage as much as he desires. all men should have perished long ere now; but for His mercy’s sake God doth not suffer him. But if men would turn their affection towards God, all would doubtless be saved, even if for some faults they might seem


Pannenberg on the embrace of Creatures by God the Creator

If God is Creator, what does this mean for His Creatures? Talk about the means and ends of the divine action, then, simply expresses the relations between finite events and beings as God himself wills them, though naturally from the standpoint of their reference to a future that transcends their finitude. We will have to support and expound this more fully later Here we may simply state that the temporal order in which creaturely things and events stand as such enables us to describe their relation to the divine action in terms of a plan (Isa. 5:19, etc.) —