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Archive for the ‘NIV’ Category

August 3rd, 2016 by Jeremy Shank

Wrestling with the Two Headed Monster of John 3.16

Hello

My name is Jeremy Shank.
I am pastor at Thornville UMC in the Foothills District.
I am currently blogging about and hoping to form ideas for a new book I’m working on.

“Inclusion/Exclusion – a look at how salvation works in the Bible” is the topic I am working with and I could use your thoughts on some things.  I was hoping you might weigh in on a couple of issues I am wrestling with right now. www.inclusionexclusion.wordpress.com

I am looking at John 3.16, probably the most well known verse concerning our salvation. I am weighing how much inclusion we see in this verse as well as the wording here that would suggest there is some exclusion to deal with, also. Some translations would put the entire conversation with Nicodemus as the words of Jesus (in red) all the way down to verse 21. (NKJV, CEB, NLT) Most notably, the NIV stops Jesus speaking (words in red) at verse 15. Which leaves the rest of the section looking like a re-capping of the conversation with Nicodemus by the author of the Gospel.

My wonderings….
1) a penny for your thoughts on John 3.16 and whether you feel more inclusive about the verse or exclusive as you read it.
2) does putting the actual words of John 3.16 into the hands of Jesus shape your feelings about how salvation works itself out in our lives.
3) any material you might suggest that I research that would help support your viewpoint and help me shape mine.

Blessings on your day

Thank you for your help

November 18th, 2015 by Joel Watts

Book Reminder: @Zondervan’s “The Greek-English New Testament: UBS 5th Revised Edition and NIV”

This really is a beautiful bible and matches up quite well to the other Greek bibles/helps.

The most widely used edition of the Greek New Testament and the most widely read contemporary English Bible translation are now available in one volume! Featuring the UBS 5 critical text (with the full apparatus) and the New International Version, this reference volume stands to become the standard edition for translators and students.

Like the 28th edition of the Nestle-Aland Novum Testamentum Graece, the UBS 5 text is the leading edition of the original text of the New Testament. It contains the same Greek text as NA28, differing only in some details of punctuation and paragraphing. The critical apparatus includes exegetically significant variants (fewer than NA28) but adds extensive manuscript evidence (more than NA28) for each variant, thereby offering in-depth instruction for students on how variants and the evidence for them work together.

The readings of the newly discovered Papyri 117 – 127 have been incorporated into this edition, thereby opening up interesting perspectives particularly for the Acts of Apostles. A special focus of the revision was on the Catholic Epistles, which included more than thirty modifications in the reading text and resulted in a new selection of witnesses for the textual apparatus, in addition to modifications of the selection of apparatus units.

Bound with a sturdy flexicover, this edition was typeset with a new, aesthetically appealing and readily legible Greek font.

Additional features of the Greek-English New Testament include:

  • Side-by-side format (UBS5 text on one page with NIV on the facing page)
  • NIV text formatted to parallel UBS5 text
  • Single column format
  • Words of Christ in black
  • Presentation page
  • Ribbon marker

Some pics:

The UBS/NIV New Testament.
The UBS/NIV New Testament

October 14th, 2015 by Joel Watts

Continuing to Celebrate the NIV’s 50th!

There are somethings you might like to read about the NIV at 50 years. 50 years old. Can you imagine that? I am but 37… that means the NIV is only 13 years older than I am!

And yes, there is a new one:

Having two editions in print of what was essentially one Bible translation was intended to satisfy the concerns of those who did not understand or accept that masculine nouns and pronouns were no longer universally understood as referring to both men and women as well as those who wanted a translation that accurately reflected contemporary usage. Though there were good intentions behind having two different editions (the 1984 NIV and the TNIV), this made it impossible for the CBT to fulfill its mandate that the NIV would be updated to reflect contemporary English usage.

By 2009, it was time for a reunion.

Biblica, Zondervan and the CBT announced that a new NIV revision would be released in 2011, and at that time, publication of the TNIV and 1984 NIV would cease. There would only be one NIV, and it would include all of the CBT’s approved changes. The CBT had only two years to conduct a major review and issue a revision. The pressure was on.

There are a lot of endorsements for the NIV as well:

A collection of endorsements from influential Christian leaders (including a video from Phillip Yancey), pastors (including this brief video from Max Lucado), and 30+ biblical scholars (see quotes from George Guthrie and Nicholas Perrin below)

Finally, there is actually a huge set of products and editions of the NIV. The one I’m looking forward to is this one.

July 14th, 2015 by Joel Watts

a NIV Zondervan Study Bible, edited by D.A. Carson

Remember when I shared this celebration about the 50th anniversary of the NIV?

The NIV Zondervan Study Bible, featuring Dr. D. A. Carson as general editor, is built on the truth of Scripture and centered on the gospel message. An ambitious and comprehensive undertaking, Dr. Carson, with committee members Dr. T. Desmond Alexander, Dr. Richard S. Hess, Dr. Douglas J. Moo, and Dr. Andrew David Naselli, along with a team of over 60 contributors from a wide range of evangelical denominations and perspectives, crafted all-new study notes and other study tools to present a biblical theology of God’s special revelation in the Scriptures. To further aid the readers’ understanding of the Bible, also included are full-color maps, charts, photos and diagrams. In addition, a single-column setting of the Bible text provides maximum readability.

Here’s a nice video:

You can find more stories here:

Check it out. Seriously, the study bible edited by DA Carson is going to be pretty awesome, I suspect.

What is the significance of “Zondervan” in the title of the NIV Zondervan Study Bible?

The Zondervan name has grown to be a trusted source for Bible resources that are academically solid and accessible to the lay Bible student, such as the Zondervan Handbook to the Bible, the Zondervan Illustrated Bible Dictionary and the Zondervan Atlas of the Bible. The NIV Zondervan Study Bible includes material of the same high quality as other Zondervan-labeled resources—up-to-date, from some of the best evangelical scholars around the world, and presented in a way that is friendly to the average adult reader. Additionally, like many other Zondervan biblical study resources, the NIV Zondervan Study Bible’s beautiful, full-color interior draws in readers and presents memorable aids to understanding the Bible.

May 11th, 2015 by Joel Watts

celebrating 50 years of the NIV (with free stuff)

In 1965, the Committee on Bible Translation, took on the most massive translation project of modern times: to prepare a contemporary English translation of the Bible from the best available original manuscripts.

Fifty years later, the New International Version remains the global standard as an accurate, beautiful, trustworthy translation of God’s Word. It’s faithful to the original text, rooted in everyday English, and perfect for biblical study—that’s what has made it the bestselling modern-English translation in the world.

And yes, there is some interesting stories about the NIV:

Additional stories related to Made to Study and the production of the NIV Study Bible: 

But wait… I said free stuff:

  • The free NIV 50th Anniversary Bible App (available in IOS and Android) provides free access to the NIV, additional quarterly content, and the notes from a variety of NIV Bibles for the 2015 calendar year
  • 365-day reading plan drawn from an NIV study or devotional Bible, delivered via email
  • An academic-level review of the translation philosophy of the NIV by Doug Moo (presented at the 2014 ETS meetings)
  • An infographic outlining the breadth and depth of NIV support materials produced for studying the Bible — more than any other English translation
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