Unsettled Christianity

Gloria Dei homo vivens – St Irenaeus
June 7th, 2017 by Joel Watts

blame the methodists for the pentecostals #NextMethodism

in part, pentecostalism (of the various kinds) emerged because methodists had grown too… mainstream… and forgotten the work of the Holy Spirit. good thing that has never happened since…

Joel Watts
Watts holds a MA in Theological Studies from United Theological Seminary. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians, as well as seeking an MA in Clinical Mental Health at Adams State University. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Comments

3 Responses to “blame the methodists for the pentecostals #NextMethodism”
  1. He forgot William Booth and The Salvation Army. Methodist heritage, started 1860’s, broke away from the Methodists (one reason – not educated at Oxford or Cambridge), but a hell of a preacher. Tent rally, street corner preaching, with drums and brass instruments.
    Fire and Blood, War Cry. Can’t get more Pentecostal than that!

  2. Bob Brooke says

    Good review of a very complex development. Didn’t realize the Methodist Church had played such a part, but not surprised to find out. Having spent 25 years of ordained ministry in the Church of God (Anderson, IN), I’ve seen first hand the results of one holiness group’s formation from the development of Pentecostalism. My main take away here is that it’s much too much to describe in 7 minutes. Thanks for sharing.

  3. Randy Myers says

    It’s a whole lot to try and get in in just seven minutes. I had Dr. Kisker for Doctrine at United, he’s a great teacher and makes the connections tracing the flow of the Spirit well. Personally, I’m thankful for the Pentecostal and the Holiness Movements and their connection to the Wesleyan stream. I found it interesting to read the Miroslav Volf was raised Pentecostal, but of a very different variety than at least the popular American version as seen on television.

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