Ways for Institutions to Embrace Student Blogging

While we are finishing redrafting the SBL paper, I wanted to share with you some of the ways I believe institutions could foster student blogging. One of the issues Brian LePort raised was insistence on Google of keeping everything. Google doesn’t actually keep everything, but it does keep a lot and for a long time.

Anyway, to answer some of the questions raises — like who owns the material, etc… — this is what I’d propose:

  1. Create a class blog via one of the blog programs that allow multiple authors or even blogs. This will allow the material created to remain under the domain of the professor if not the institution. This point will help define the following points.
  2. Blogging is not meant to take the place of classroom learning nor classroom participation. It is merely meant to supplement it. To insure the student engages in the classroom, the professor should require blogging but likewise limit blogging. Require a certain number of blog posts or other online engagement, because by doing so you also may reserve the right to limit engagement.
  3. Allow your students to blog their classroom assignment and/or experience. However, as I was cautioned by one of my professors, do not allow them to mention other students.
  4. Encourage early and often online publication via the various online journals and magazines such as Bible and Interpretation and The Marginalia Review. While many may be turned down at first, learning how to write for a wider audience will only benefit them in the end.
  5. Become a blogger

Thoughts?

Post By Joel Watts (10,051 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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