Quick Question – Leviticus and Deuteronomy

I was speaking to my rather elderly neighbor yesterday and a topic involving Leviticus and Deuteronomy came up.

This is how I explained the difference:

  • Leviticus presents a ritualistic (priestly/land) holiness
  • Deuteronomy presents a political holiness

Thoughts?

New one… per comments

  • Leviticus presents a ritualistic (priestly/land) holiness
  • Deuteronomy presents a political faithfulness.

Post By Joel Watts (10,056 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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4 thoughts on Quick Question – Leviticus and Deuteronomy

  1. There are very few references to the holiness of the people in Deuteronomy. I would say Deuteronomy’s about cultic fidelity, not holiness. Holiness is a priestly ideal.

  2. I’d say Leviticus is a priest’s handbook on how to stir the pot. (And Aaron priests flexing their muscle on how self-important they are for the whole process of interceding with God). A sole source contract, if you will, to Aaron priests and their monopoly on temple sacrifices in Jerusalem.
    Deuteronomy is Jeremiah’s call to reform under Josiah, with laws for the people, and Moses and all the Levites playing the good guys. A return to the “good old days”, when Moses was “the Man”, and little brother was put back in his place.

    My mean aside, if I didn’t like my neighbor: Leviticus 14 still sounds more like voodoo to me. And the Book of Law just happened to be found in the temple while being repaired. Sure, and I have a bridge I’d like to sell you.

  3. Forgot to say, thus I personally think Joel is correct. Leviticus, priests (Aaron, self-righteous) holiness, Deuteronomy, political, reformation (back to Moses) holiness.

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