In the Mail: A Poetic Discontent, Austin Farrer and the Gospel of Mark (Library of New Testament Studies)

Part of the official book description:

Austin Farrer has often been described as the one genius that the Church of England produced in the twentieth century. He wrote and spoke widely as a philosophical theologian, a biblical scholar and as a preacher. Farrer’s philosophical work is read widely and some of his sermons are still in print, forty years after his death. His biblical writings, however, have been largely ignored, even at the time they were written. Robert Titley asks whether, in respect of his work on the Gospel of Mark, this neglect is justified. Titley’s approach is from three angles, looking at Farrer on Mark as literature, as history, and as scripture. Farrer’s reflections are far from simple, and they show that these apparently simple categories, ‘Literature’, ‘History’ and ‘Scripture’, are themselves in need of refinement if they are not to mislead.

The part in bold is what stands out to me. Ignored? What about Goulder… Goodacre and others following in their footsteps?

Anyway, I was happy to receive this via a new book review (to me) program from Rice University.

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

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