Political Debate: Topic 2 – Budget

This is the current question to which I destroy Elgin:

There are three general ways to state one’s approach to budgetary issues: 1) In broad goals, such as budget balanced or not, high or low taxes, etc., 2) In details, as in which programs should be cut or expanded, which taxes or types of taxes should be cut or raised, etc., and 3) As political strategy, how does one approach the battle of the budget, what can one pass, what issues can be on the table and how one can get the other side to move your way.

What would your priorities be in terms of reshaping the budget and the budget process? Please illustrate with at least one concrete detail, and give some attention to how you and your political allies could help put your principles into action.

Joel Watts’ Reply

Elgin Hushbeck’s Reply

via Political Debate: Topic 2 | Energion.Net.

Post By Joel L. Watts (10,125 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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6 thoughts on “Political Debate: Topic 2 – Budget

  1. Neither of you addressed the most critical point. Even if we should adopt a workable 5 or 10 year budget for the federal government there is no way to compell the congress not to inflate the spending to feed their private desires. The real problem is not the budget but rather the moral fiber of the voters that allows the election of officials that are willing to buy favor with money that is not their’s. When the money comes out of someone else’s pocket there is very little incentive to make sure it is used wisely. Currently there seems to be no penalty for a politician spending foolishly because the voters are not well enough educated to care. Despite all the federal money spent on education the overall results are no better if as good as 50 years ago and no one really seems to care. Example: the stupid claim by some prominent politicians that the aim is to have all public school grads prepared for college and no one cares enough to challenge this idea.

  2. Thank you Joel. I considered that but I have been trying to limit the sites I am registered with as I hardly have time to take care of what I try to support now.

  3. “What would your priorities be in terms of reshaping the budget and the budget process? Please illustrate with at least one concrete detail”

    No occupation and continuation of war.

    From a commenter , “Despite all the federal money spent on education the overall results are no better if as good as 50 years ago and no one really seems to care.”

    Seems like no one considers war as a valid budget cutter.

    A few days ago, I heard Wolf Blitzer ask Lindsey Graham why we couldn’t get out of Afganistan now, instead of next year. Graham said its too early. We must listen to the generals. A self fulfilling strategy. I just wish that Blitzer would have mentioned that after 12 years fighting in Afganistan, with nothing accomplished, one extra year will make all the difference in the world? I bet, especially if you happen to be the next soldier in Afganistan to get his legs blown off.

  4. Joel,
    I don’t have much else to add to my first post. My primary point is that budgets don’t matter much if the voters are only taught to feed back what they are told by a teacher and frequently are penalized for any independent thought. I know we have all had this experience but the very best teachers I had would emphasize independent thinking as long as it could be supported intelligently.

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