Hey @logos, @academiclogos, maybe it should read this way

The product description for the pre-pub’d Revised English Bible goes like this:

The Apocrypha—a Greek word meaning “hidden things”—is composed of 15 books or fragments that exist outside the Hebrew canon. Though not part of Hebrew Scriptures, they were originally written in Hebrew, and they provide a bridge between the Old and New Testaments. They were the books included in the Latin Vulgate by St. Jerome. The REB Apocrypha, like the rest of the Revised English Bible, provides a version that’s both faithful and idiomatic, conveying a purer meaning of the original texts.

I would propose to change it this way:

The Apocrypha—a Greek word meaning “hidden things”— is composed of 15 books or fragments that exist outside the Hebrew canon. Several of these books were used in the great Christological controversies of early Christianity and were part of the earliest bible, the Septuagint, for the Church. Challenged by the Protestants, named deuterocanon (Greek for “the second canon”) by the Catholics and the Orthodox, these books provide a bridge between the Old and New Testaments and are an important study tool for theological development. The REB Apocrypha, like the rest of the Revised English Bible, provides a version that’s both faithful and idiomatic, conveying a purer meaning of the original texts.

I mean, I know why I like the Deuterocanon…  It is not just a set of hidden books, but a vital part of Church history and theology, as well as a method of examination of Second Temple Judaism, every bit as important as the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Also, if you would be so kind as to pre-order this, I would appreciate it. Thanks.

Post By Joel Watts (10,074 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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1 thought on Hey @logos, @academiclogos, maybe it should read this way

  1. In most cases for published works, they simply go by information provided directly by the publisher (whether online, in a catalog, etc.). This may not be one of those cases, however.

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