Some thoughts on #Sherlock’s Finale

It was awesome. There are some loose ends which I hope will be cleared up, but over all, this was a a vehicle which showed some development for the Sherlock-Watson friendship, as well as Sherlock’s character over all. After all, the line which separates the villain from the hero is a rather small one. Sherlock and Jim are the same, except for one small issue. Sherlock has rationally chosen friends above himself, even will bemoaning that he has no actual friends.

If you’ve read the books, you know that Holmes faked his death once, so to see it on screen was expected. But, t

Sherlock (finished version)

Sherlock (finished version) (Photo credit: Dalekwidow)

he emotion which was poured into it is outstanding. Only the British seem to be able to write shows anymore that are actually intelligent and emotional. I mean, the final scene is one worth watching over and over again.

Now, how in the world do we find out how?

I think that this season (or series, if you are fortunate enough to be British) allowed for a real development of the relationships of the characters. The Adler episode was interesting for a variety of reasons. First, it developed (albeit in an unnamed manner) sapiosexuality. Clearly, both characters were sexually attracted to each other sexually, but not because of the nudity, but because of brain power both displayed. This doesn’t happen often on television. I found a quote which pretty well sums up the attraction between Sherlock and Adler,

“I want an incisive, inquisitive, insightful, irreverent mind. I want someone for whom philosophical discussion is foreplay. I want someone who sometimes makes me go ouch due to their wit and evil sense of humor. I want someone that I can reach out and touch randomly. I want someone I can cuddle with.

I decided all that means that I am sapiosexual.”

No idea where it comes from, but it is just about what you see when you watch that episode.

The Hounds episode was a different take on it, but excellent for connecting the show to the USA and current ethical dilemmas.

Anyway, not much here. Just wanted to post about Sherlock. If you haven’t seen it, go. The first season is on Netflix Streaming. You have no excuse.

Oh, and you love me, don’t watch the CBS attempt at destroying good television.

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Post By Joel Watts (10,077 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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