Fishermen and Peter…. in Jeremiah 16.16

ἰδοὺ ἐγὼ ἀποστέλλω τοὺς ἁλεεῖς τοὺς πολλούς λέγει κύριος καὶ ἁλιεύσουσιν αὐτούς καὶ μετὰ ταῦτα ἀποστελῶ τοὺς πολλοὺς θηρευτάς καὶ θηρεύσουσιν αὐτοὺς ἐπάνω παντὸς ὄρους καὶ ἐπάνω παντὸς βουνοῦ καὶ ἐκ τῶν τρυμαλιῶν τῶν πετρῶν (Jer 16:16 BGT)

Can’t say much about this…. but honestly, if you think that Mark is using classical Greek myth to tell his story, your theory is completely unsupported.

Post By Joel Watts (10,045 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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4 thoughts on Fishermen and Peter…. in Jeremiah 16.16

  1. I don’t understand what you’re trying to say…ἁλεεῖς (haleeis) is the proper accusative pl for ἁλιεύς, but it is said that the word comes from ὰλς which is Homeric.
    Are you saying that there are people who believe that Mark ripped off this story?

    • Every author borrows from another, but identifying the proper source is important. Dennis MacDonald supposes that Mark’s fishermen brothers come not from the Old Testament, but from Homeric poems.

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