Review: Dad’s Bible: The Father’s Plan (Hardcover)

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With notes by Robert Wolgemuth, Thomas Nelson has devotional-style bible geared to fathers, and just in time for their special day. The embossed hardcover book is not meant to be a traditional study bible, noticeable by the use of the New Century Version, but to be used by fathers in ‘daddy situations.’

It is wholly conservative evangelical in its approach to biblical headship, the authority of the husband, and other issues (found int he Q & A section in the appendix) such as Creation. The notes are arranged into several topic including ‘Walking in Authority’, ‘Godly Character’, ‘Passing it On’, ‘Dads in the Bible’, ‘Building your Children’, and ‘Insights.’ Unlike the Mom’s Bible, which is the companion to the Dad’s bible, the notes system focuses on the authority of the husband.

The Question and Answer Section in the appendix covers a variety of modern day questioning, such as,

  • Did Jesus Have to Go to School? (1375)
  • Is it wrong to be rich (1361)
  • Can Scientists Prove that Creation isn’t true? (1355)

Thoroughly evangelical in its answers, the Dad’s Bible attempts to answer the questions for its conservative audiences generally basing their answers on previous works, all referenced for further reading, as well to biblical texts. Each book is prefaced with an introduction in, much like the NCV, modern day language. Sometimes, you will find the introduction as an allegory. Rarely will you find theological insights, but this bible is not meant to be this – it is a devotional. So too the Topics found throughout the bible. The bible is based on the NCV, which may be too loose for many. It might do Thomas Nelson well to off the Dad’s and Mom’s bible in something more traditional.

The bible is aesthetic in its appearance, from its embossed cover to its ‘aged’ look on the pages. It would make a nice gift to fathers in the evangelical tradition, new or old.

You can read another review, here.

Post By Joel Watts (10,110 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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3 thoughts on “Review: Dad’s Bible: The Father’s Plan (Hardcover)

  1. I think that it is a good idea for a Father's Day present, at least for the people who can handle reading the (written in modern day English) versions of the Bible. There are lots of different versions of the Bible. I myself prefer to read the KJV Bible. But, I have seen fun little kid's versions of the Bible which parent's can use to help their kids like reading it and understand the stories so if this “Dad's Bible” is similar to that then it sounds like a pretty fun idea.

    Jake (Foundation For The Advancement Of Religion Online)

    http://www.religionresourcesonline.org/

  2. Thanks for the comments, Jake. My general preference is the NLT. Not a big fan of the NCV. The bible itself would make a nice gift, especially for new fathers/Christians

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