A New Translation: Mark 2

I have translated five chapters of Mark (the first one here), and because I would like constructive feedback, I will post them from time to time. Please remember that these were translated a few years ago, using a small variety of tools.

Again, he enters into Capernaum after several days and it is reported that he is in the house. Immediately, many are gathered together, so much so that there is no longer any room, no, not even at the door; he is speaking gently the word to them. They come to him, bringing a paralyzed man — borne up by four. Not being able to come near him because of the crowd, they uncovered the roof where he was, and having dug through, they let down the bed on which the paralyzed man was lying. And having seen their faith, Jesus says to them, “My child, your sins are forgiven.”

But there were some of the scribes sitting there, considering this in their hearts, “Why is he speaking such blasphemous words? Who is able to forgive sins but the one God? Immediately Jesus fully perceives in his spirit what they considered within themselves.

He says to them, “Why do you consider these things in your heart? “Which is easier to say to the paralyzed man? ‘Your sins are forgiven?’

Or to say, ‘Arise, take up your bed and walk? But so that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins” — (he says to the paralyzed man) — “I say to you, Get up! Take up your bed and go your way to your house.” And immediately, the man rises up, takes up his bed and before all, goes out.

They were all astonished and began to glorify God, saying, “We have never seen it done like this.”

Again, he goes out by the seaside, and all of the crowd keeps coming to him and he keeps teaching them. Passing by, he sees Levi the son of Alphaeus, sitting at the tax office. He says to him, “Follow with me.” And he, having risen up, follows him.

It happens that as Jesus reclines to eat in Levi’s house, many tax collectors and sinners eat with Jesus and his disciples — for there were many, and they followed him. The scribes and the Pharisees, seeing him eat with tax-collectors and sinners, say to his disciples, “How is it he eats and drinks with tax-collectors and sinners?”

When Jesus hears it, he says to them, “They who are strong have no need of a physician — but they who are sick. I did not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.

Now the disciples of John and the Pharisees were fasting. They come to him and say, “Why do the disciples of John and the Pharisees fast, but your disciples do not?”

The Jesus asks them, “Can the sons of the bride chamber fast while the bridegroom is with them? As long as they have the bride’s groom with them, they cannot fast. But the days will come when the bride’s groom will be taken away from them, then they shall fast — in those days. No one sews a patch of new cloth on an old garment, or else when the new patch fills the old, the tear becomes worse. And no one puts new wine into old wineskins because the new wine will burst the wineskins, and when the wine is poured out, the wineskins will be ruined. The new wine must be put into new wineskins.”

It happens that he is going along, through the cornfields on the Sabbath; his disciples begin to make their way, plucking ears of corn. The Pharisees say to him, “Look! Why are they doing that which is unlawful on the Sabbath?”

He asks them, “Did you ever read what David did, when he had need and was hungry — he and those with him? How he went into the house of God in the time of Abiathar the high priest and ate the Bread of Presence — which is unlawful to eat, except to the priests, and David gave also to those with him?” Then he says them, “The Sabbath came to be for all and not humanity for the Sabbath. Therefore the Son of Man is Lord also of the Sabbath.”

Post By Joel L. Watts (10,125 Posts)

Joel L. Watts holds a Masters of Arts from United Theological Seminary with a focus in literary and rhetorical criticism of the New Testament. He is currently a Ph.D. student at the University of the Free State, analyzing Paul’s model of atonement in Galatians. He is the author of Mimetic Criticism of the Gospel of Mark: Introduction and Commentary (Wipf and Stock, 2013), a co-editor and contributor to From Fear to Faith: Stories of Hitting Spiritual Walls (Energion, 2013), and Praying in God's Theater, Meditations on the Book of Revelation (Wipf and Stock, 2014).

Website: → Unsettled Christianity

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3 thoughts on “A New Translation: Mark 2

  1. Please pass this on to Joel Watts – Thanks

    Oct. 21, 2009, you stated that you had completed the first 5 chapters of Mark. Where can I locate them on the Internet? If not available on the web, could you send them to me on an e-mail? In fact, I already seen your translation on Philemon, however I am interested in ALL of your biblical translation work. I want to list the bibliographical data on them in my up-coming Bible Bibliography.

    In your browser type in my name as shown above in quote marks and you will receive around 5-6 pages of hits. You will easily find my 1st edition which is still in print after 21 years. It had set a new standard for Bible Bibliographies.

    Thanks for your help.

    • William, if you don’t mind, let me work on this and I’ll send you what I have soon. I do appreciate your help in getting Philemon out. And Mark is my favorite book, of course.

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